The International Society of the Learning Sciences is pleased to announce the creation of the ISLS Fellows program. An endeavor begun years ago by the Awards committee and approved by the Board of Directors, the ISLS Fellows program recognizes those who have made major contributions to the field of the Learning Sciences since its inception nearly three decades ago. These individuals are each highly accomplished scholars and community members who will continue to serve in critical roles for the society in the future through their continued leadership and mentorship activities. The formal announcement of the Fellows program took place on June 22, 2017 at the 2017 Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) conference in Philadelphia, one of two biennial academic research conferences sponsored by ISLS. 

The inaugural cohort of fellows consisted distinguished learning scientists who have served previously as elected presidents of the society, editors of the two flagship journals (Journal of the Learning Sciences and International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning), and founders of the field. 

New fellows are named in subsequent years through a selection committee consisting of existing ISLS fellows.

The fellows include:

  • Pierre Dillenbourg - École Polytechnique Fédérale De Lausanne (Switzerland)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Ludwig-Maximillians-Universitāt München (Germany)
  • Barry Fishman - University of Michigan (USA)
  • Susan Goldman - University of Illinois, Chicago (USA)
  • Friedrich Hesse - Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (Germany)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Indiana University (USA)
  • Christopher Hoadley - New York University (USA)
  • Ton de Jong - University of Twente (Netherlands)
  • Yasmin Kafai - University of Pennsylvania (USA)
  • Paul Kirschner - Open University of the Netherlands (Netherlands)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Boston College (USA)
  • Timothy Koschmann - Southern Illinois University (USA)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Cyprus University of Technology (Cyprus)
  • Nancy Law - Hong Kong University (Hong Kong)
  • Marcia C. Linn - University of California, Berkeley (USA)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - University of Nottingham (UK)
  • Roy Pea - Stanford University (USA)
  • James Pellegrino - University of Illinois, Chicago (USA)
  • William Penuel - University of Colorado, Boulder (USA)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA)
  • Jeremy Roschelle - Digital Promise (USA)
  • Carolyn Rosé - Carnegie-Mellon University (USA)
  • Nikol Rummel - Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - University of Illinois, Chicago (USA)
  • William Sandoval - University of Calirofnia, Los Angeles (USA)
  • Gerry Stahl - Drexel University (USA)
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Ben Gurion University of the Negev (Israel)
  • Susan Yoon -  University of Pennsylvania (USA)

Additionally, Naomi Miyake (1949-2015) (University of Tokyo) has been named an inaugural fellow in memoriam as part of the inaugural cohort.


Short biographies

Pierre Dillenbourg
Prof. of Learning Technologues, School of Computer & Communication Sciences, Swiss federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL)
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: https://people.epfl.ch/pierre.dillenbourg/bio?lang=en&cvlang=en
Year of induction: 2017

A former teacher in elementary school, Pierre Dillenbourg graduated in educational science (University of Mons, Belgium). He started his research on learning technologies in 1984. He obtained a PhD in computer science from the University of Lancaster (UK), in the domain of artificial intelligence applications for education. He has been assistant professor at the University of Geneva. He joined EPFL in 2002. He has been the academic director of Center for Digital Education, which implements the MOOC strategy of EPFL (over 2 million registrations). He is full professor in learning technologies in the School of Computer & Communication Sciences, where he is the head of the CHILI Lab: "Computer-Human Interaction for Learning & Instruction ». He is the director of the leading house DUAL-T, which develops technologies for dual vocational education systems (carpenters, florists,...). With EPFL colleagues, he launched in 2017 the Swiss EdTech Collider, an incubator with 70 start-ups in learning technologies In 2018, he co-founded LEARN, the EPFL Center of Learning Sciences that brings together the local initiatives in educational innovation.

Barry Fishman
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Professor of Learning Technologies, School of Information and School of Education, The University of Michigan
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fishman/
Year of induction: 2018

Barry Fishman is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Learning Technologies in the University of Michigan School of Information and School of Education. His research focuses on: video games as models for learning environments, teacher learning and the role of technology in supporting teacher learning, and the development of usable, scalable, and sustainable learning innovations through design-based implementation research (http://learndbir.org), which he helped to establish. He is also the co-creator of GradeCraft, a game-inspired learning management system (http://gradecraft.com/). Dr. Fishman currently serves as Innovator-In-Residence at the University of Michigan Office of Academic Innovation. He is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education. He was co-author of the Obama Administration’s 2010 U.S. National Educational Technology Plan, and served as Associate Editor of The Journal of the Learning Sciences from 2005-2012 In 2017, Dr. Fishman was named the Michigan Association of State Universities “Distinguished Professor of the Year.” He received the 2016 “Campus Technology Innovator of the Year Award” for work with GradeCraft, was the 2010 recipient of the Provost’s Teaching Innovation Prize, the 2003 Pattishall Junior Faculty Research Award, and was the 2001 recipient of the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies from the American Educational Research Association. He received his A.B. from Brown University in English and American Literature in 1989, his M.S. from Indiana University in Instructional Systems Technology in 1992, and his Ph.D. in Learning Sciences from Northwestern University in 1996.

Susan R. Goldman
Distinguished Professor, Learning Sciences Research Institute Co-Director, University of Illinois at Chicago
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: 
Year of induction: 2017

Susan R. Goldman, (PhD., University of Pittsburgh) is Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Psychology, and Education and Co-Director of the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She conducts research on subject matter learning, instruction, assessment, and roles for technology. Most recently, she has focused on understanding the literacy demands in different academic disciplines and the implications of these demands for supporting learning, especially in adolescents   (www.projectreadi.org). This work expanded to a focus on how teachers learn to engage in the forms of instruction called for by literacy, mathematics, and science programs that are consistent with the deep learning needed to meet the demands of the 21st century. She collaborates with educational practitioners to bridge research and practice. She is a member of the National Academy of Education, an Inaugural Fellow of the Society for Text and Discourse and of the International Society of the Learning Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She served on the ISLS Board of Directors from 2009 – 2015, and as its President in 2012-2013. She is Executive Officer of the ISLS 2016 – 2021. She has also served on the Board of Directors of the Society for Text and Discourse from its founding until 2007 and as the third President from 2000 – 2007. Goldman has held Associate Editor positions for  Discourse Processes (1998 – 2010), the Journal of Educational Psychology (2007– 2012), and is on the editorial board of the Journal of the Learning Sciences.

Friedrich W. Hesse
Founding Director, Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Tuebingen
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: http://www.iwm-tuebingen.de/f.hesse
Year of induction: 2017

Friedrich Hesse is Founding Director of the Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM) and at present head of the Knowledge Exchange Lab. He is Scientific Vice-President of the Leibniz Association (an umbrella organization for 93 research institutes in Germany) and is holding the Chair of the Department for Applied Cognitive- and Media Psychology at the University of Tuebingen. Friedrich Hesse has been initiator and speaker for the first Virtual Graduate School Knowledge acquisition and knowledge exchange with new media funded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Society, DFG), the DFG-Priority Programme Netbased Knowledge Communication, the DFG-Research Group Analysis and Promotion of Effective Processes of Learning and Instruction and the first Leibniz- ScienceCampus Informational Environments. Friedrich W. Hesse studied psychology at the Universities of Marburg and Duesseldorf, received his doctorate at the RWTH Aachen and qualified as Professor of Psychology at the University of Goettingen. He was research fellow at the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) and at the Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. He was Head of the Department of Applied Cognitive Science at the German Institute of Research for Distance Education (DIFF) and for two years director at the Laboratoire Européen de Recherche sur les Apprentissages et les Nouvelles Technologies (LERANT) in Frankreich funded by CNRS.

Chris Hoadley
Associate Professor, New York University
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: http://www.tophe.net
Year of induction: 2017

Dr. Chris Hoadley is associate professor in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. His research focuses on collaborative technologies for learning and human flourishing, computer support for cooperative learning (CSCL), and design-based research methods, a term he coined in the late 1990s. Hoadley is the director of dolcelab, the Laboratory for Design Of Learning, Collaboration & Experience. He is a fellow of the International Society for the Learning Sciences (ISLS) and was an affiliate scholar for the National Academy of Engineering's Center for the Advancement of Scholarship in Engineering Education (CASEE), and was a Fulbright Scholar in India and Nepal.  From 2011-2013, he was program director of the Educational Technology programs at NYU and founding program director of the Games for Learning program, and on the founding faculty presidium of MAGNET, the NYU Media And Games Network. From 2013-2016, he was on loan to the National Science Foundation as the program director in charge of the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program in the Directorate of Computer and Information Science and Engineering and the Directorate of Education and Human Resources Division of Research on Learning. Hoadley previously chaired the American Educational Research Association's Special Interest Group for Education in Science and Technology (now SIG: Learning Sciences), and served as the co-founder and first president of the International Society for the Learning Sciences.

Ton de Jong
Chair of the Department of instructional Technology, University of Twente
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. websitehttp://users.edte.utwente.nl/jong/Index.htm
Year of induction: 2018

Ton de Jong holds a chair in Instructional Technology at the University of Twente, the Netherlands. He specializes in inquiry learning and collaborative learning (mainly in science domains) supported by technology. He was coordinator of several EU projects and several national projects including the ZAP project in which interactive games/simulations for psychology were developed. ZAPs commercial licences now go over 80.000 in number. He was coordinator of the 7th framework Go-Lab project on learning with online laboratories in science and currently is coordinator of its H2020 follow-up project Next-Lab (see www.golabz.eu). He published over 200 journal articles and book chapters, was associate editor for the Journal of Engineering Education and for Instructional Science and currently is on the editorial board of eight journals. He has published papers in Science on inquiry learning with computer simulations (2006), design environments (2013), and virtual laboratories (2013). He is AERA fellow and was elected member of the Academia Europaea in 2014. He has been  dean of the master programme Educational Science and Technology at the University of Twente.

Yasmin Kafai 
Lori and Michael Milken President’s Distinguished Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania.
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: www.yasminkafai.com
Year of induction: 2017

Yasmin B. Kafai is a learning scientist and designer of online tools and communities to promote coding, crafting, and creativity across grades K–16. Her work empowers students to use computer programming to design games, sew electronic textiles, and grow applications in biology with the goal of supporting creative expression, building social connections, and broadening participation in computing. She helped develop with MIT colleagues the popular programming tool Scratch—known as the YouTube of interactive media—where millions of kids create and share their programs. With Exploring Computer Science, she has developed a high school curriculum with electronic textiles to introduce high school students to creative computing. In her recent book series on youth digital media published by MIT Press, she unveils the connections between playing online, learning programming, and making games for more constructive and creative participation in networked communities, see Connected Play: Tweens in a Virtual World,(with Deborah Fields), Connected Code: Why Children Need to Learn Programming and Connected Gaming: What Making Video Games Can Teach Us about Learning and Literacy, (both written with Quinn Burke). Her award-winning work has received generous funding from the National Science Foundation, Spencer Foundation, MacArthur Foundation and Google.    She worked with Seymour Papert and Idit Harel at the MIT Media Laboratory from 1989–1994 and then joined the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association and the International Society of the Learning Sciences.

Paul A. Kirschner
Distinguished University Professor and Professor of Educational Psychology and the Open University of the Netherlands.
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: www.ou.nl/profiel/pki
Year of induction: 2017

Paul A. Kirschner, dr.h.c. (1951) is Distinguished University Professor and professor of educational psychology at the Open University of the Netherlands as well as Visiting Professor of Education with a special emphasis on Learning and Interaction in Teacher Education at the University of Oulu, Finland. He is Research Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, the International Society of the Learning Sciences, and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Science. He is a past President (2010-2011) of the International Society for the Learning Sciences and a former member of the Dutch Educational Council and, as such, was advisor to the Minister of Education (2000-2004). He is also a member of the Scientific Technical Council of the Foundation for University Computing Facilities (SURF WTR), chief editor of Journal of Computer Assisted Learning and associate editor of Computers in Human Behavior. As for books, he is co-author of the recently released book Urban Myths about Learning and Education as well as of the highly successful book Ten steps to complex learning, and editor of two other books (Visualizing Argumentation and What we know about CSCL

Timothy Koschmann
Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Medical Education, Southern Illinois University
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: http://siumed.academia.edu/tdk​ 
Year of induction: 2017

Timothy Koschmann is a Professor Emeritus of Medical Education at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. He began his training in Philosophy (B.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City) going on to complete advanced degrees in Experimental Psychology (M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) and Computer Science (Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology, 1987). He was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Faculty of Education at Göteborg University in 2013.
Koschmann is a communication scholar with a special interest in practical organizations of instructing. Early in his career he took an avid interest in the possibilities for using technology to support collaboration and learning. This inevitably led to more foundational inquiries into precisely how understanding is displayed and monitored within interaction. He has done extensive fieldwork in settings in which physicians and surgeons do their work and receive their training. Koschmann uses digital video and other associated exhibits as aids in fixing events of interest for later reconstruction and analysis.

Nancy Law
Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong 
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website:https://web.edu.hku.hk/staff/academic/nlaw
Year of induction: 2019

Dr Nancy Law is a professor in the Division of Information Technology in Education, Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong. She served as the Founding Director for the Centre for Information Technology in Education (CITE) for 15 years from 1998. She also led the Science of Learning Strategic Research Theme at the University of Hong Kong. She is widely known known for her work in the integration of digital technology in learning and teaching to promote scalable student-centred pedagogical innovations. Her research interests include international comparative studies of technology-enabled learning innovations, models of ICT integration in schools and change leadership, computer supported collaborative learning, the use of expressive and exploratory computer-based learning environments, learning design and learning analytics. She received a Humanities and Social Sciences Prestigious Fellowship Scheme Award by the Hong Kong SAR Research Grants Council in 2014 in recognition of her outstanding research. She has served as an executive editor of the International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning since 2013.

Marcia C. Linn
Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: http://telscenter.org/mclinn
Year of induction: 2017

Marcia C. Linn is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Psychological Association(APA), the Association for Psychological Science (APS), the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).  She has served as President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), Chair of the AAAS Education Section, and on the boards of the AAAS, the Educational Testing Service Graduate Record Examination, the McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Studies in Education Practice, and the National Science Foundation Education and Human Resources Directorate. Awards include the National Association for Research in Science Teaching Award for Lifelong Distinguished Contributions to Science Education, the American Educational Research Association Willystine Goodsell Award, and the Council of Scientific Society Presidents first award for Excellence in Educational Research.

 Linn earned her Ph. D. at Stanford University where she worked with Lee Cronbach. She spent a year in Geneva working with Jean Piaget, a year in Israel as a Fulbright Professor, and a year in London at University College. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences three times. Her books include Computers, Teachers, Peers (2000), Internet Environments for Science Education (2004), Designing Coherent Science Education (2008), WISE Science (2009), and Science Teaching and Learning: Taking Advantage of Technology to Promote Knowledge Integration (2011) [Chinese Translation, 2015]. She chairs the Technology, Education—Connections (TEC) series for Teachers College Press.

Roy Pea
David Jacks Professor of Education and Learning Sciences, and Professor, Computer Science (Courtesy), Stanford University
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website:https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Roy_Pea2 
Year of induction: 2017

 

Roy Pea is Stanford University’s David Jacks Professor of Education & Learning Sciences, and by courtesy, Computer Science; Director, H-STAR Institute (Human Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research), and founder and Director of Stanford’s PhD program in Learning Sciences and Technology Design. Publishes extensively—225 publications including 5 edited volumes in K-12 learning and education, esp. science, math & technology fostered by advanced technologies including scientific visualization, on-line learning communities, digital video collaboratories and mobile computers. Co-Editor, Learning Analytics in Education (2018); Co-author, 2010 US National Education Technology Plan; Co-editor, Video Research in the Learning Sciences (2007); NAS co-author: How People Learn (2000). Fellow: National Academy of Education, Association for Psychological Science, American Educational Research Association, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. President, International Society for the Learning Sciences (‘04-‘05); ISLS Inaugural Fellow (‘17). Roy holds five patents in interactive and panoramic video innovations and received innovation awards from Apple Computer, IBM. Co-Founder & Director, Teachscape.com (‘99-’09), teacher professional development services company. Launched & directed 1st Learning Sciences PhD Program, Northwestern, 1991. In 1978, received doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Oxford, England, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. His consulting has included education program advisement for Ameritech, Apple Computer, Atlantic Philanthropies, ETS, Fisher Price, George Lucas Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Markle Foundation, Mellon Foundation, National Science Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation, Scholastic, Sesame Workshop, Sloan Foundation, Spencer Foundation, the states of Illinois and California, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, Finland, Singapore, Sweden, and Taiwan.

Jim Pellegrino
University of Illinois at Chicago, Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor; Distinguished professor of Education; Co-Director of Learning Sciences Research Institute
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website:http://www.lsri.uic.edu/people/james-pellegrino
Year of induction: 2019

James W. Pellegrino is Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor and Co-director of the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research and development interests focus on children's and adult's thinking and learning and the implications of cognitive research and theory for assessment and instructional practice. He has published over 300 books, chapters and
articles in the areas of cognition, instruction and assessment. His research is funded by the National Science Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences, and private foundations. He has served on several National Academy of Sciences study committees, including chair of the Study Committee for the Evaluation of the National and State Assessments of Educational Progress, co-chair of the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice, and co-chair of the Committee on the Foundations of Assessment which issued the report Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. Most recently he served as a member of the Committee on Science Learning: Games, Simulations and Education, as a member of the Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New Science Education Standards, as chair of the Committee on Defining Deeper Learning and 21st Century Skills, and co-chair of the Committee on Developing Assessments of Science Proficiency in K-12. He is a past member of the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council, a lifetime Associate of the National Academy of Sciences, a lifetime member of the National Academy of Education and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

William Penuel
Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development, School of Education, University of Colorado Boulder
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: 
https://www.colorado.edu/education/william-penuel
Year of induction: 2019

Bill Penuel is a Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development in the School of Education and Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. He designs and studies curriculum materials, assessments, and professional learning experiences for teachers in science. He works in partnership with school districts and state departments of education, and the research he conducts is in support of educational equity in three dimensions: (1) equitable implementation of new science standards; (2) creating inclusive classroom cultures that attend to students’ affective experiences and where all students have authority for constructing knowledge together; and (3) connecting teaching to the interests, experiences, and identities of learners. His research employs a wide range of research methods, including one his colleagues and he have developed called design-based implementation research (http://learndbir.org). He regularly offers workshops to researchers and education leaders on how to build and sustain research-practice partnerships and has authored two books on research-practice partnerships, Creating Research-Practice Partnerships in Education (Harvard Education Press, 2017), and Connecting Research and Practice for Educational Improvement (Routledge, 2018). He is a member of the National Academy of Education, and he is a Fellow of both the International Society for Design and Development in Education and the American Educational Research Association. He received his B.A. from Clark University in psychology in 1991, his Ed.M. in Counseling Processes from Harvard University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Clark University in 1996.

Jeremy Roschelle
Executive Director, Learning Sciences Research, Digital Promise
email: jroschelle@digitalpromise.org website: https://digitalpromise.org/our-team/jeremy-roschelle/
Year of induction: 2019

Jeremy Roschelle is the Executive Director of Learning Sciences Research at Digital Promise, a nonprofit research organization that works closely with innovative schools. He is know for research on computer-supported collaborative learning; learning with connected, mobile devices; technology in mathematics learning; and for working on the challenge of scaling up learning sciences innovations. He has conducted rigorous efficacy research on personalized, adaptive learning, on online homework tools, and on dynamic visualizations for mathematics learning. His 25 years of research experience have led to over 125 publications and 9 patents, resulting in over 15,000 citations. Since 2012, he has been the leader of large knowledge network of US projects in the area of “cyberlearning” which combines learning sciences, computer science and data science to investigate the future of learning. He has collaborated extensively with colleagues in the US, Singapore, Taiwan, the UK and Israel and has hosted many international learning scientists in California during their sabbatical year. Currently, he is working on bringing learning sciences into large scale school improvement in partnerships with Digital Promise’s League of Innovative Schools – a network of school districts that educate 4 million students. Dr. Roschelle has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Learning Sciences for over 20 years and is currently working with the ISLS publications committee to develop a Rapid Community Reports series. He is excited to work with new generations of learning scientists to make our field even stronger and more impactful.

Carolyn Rosé
Professor of Language Technologies and Human-Computer Interaction, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~cprosehttp://dance.cs.cmu.edu
Year of induction: 2017

Dr. Carolyn Penstein Rosé’s research program is focused on better understanding the social and pragmatic nature of conversation, and using this understanding to build computational systems that can improve the efficacy of conversation between people, and between people and computers. She invokes theories and methods from computational discourse analysis, conversational agents, and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning.  Her approach is to investigate how conversation works from a theoretical perspective and then formalize this understanding in models that are precise enough to be reproducible and demonstrate explanatory power in connection with outcomes with real world value. Her research has birthed and contributed to the growth of two areas of research: namely, Automated Analysis of Collaborative Learning Processes and Dynamic Support for Collaborative Learning, where intelligent conversational agents support collaborative learning in a context sensitive way.  Her research group’s highly interdisciplinary work, published in over 200 peer reviewed publications, is represented in the top venues in 5 fields: namely, Language Technologies, Learning Sciences, Cognitive Science, Educational Technology, and Human-Computer Interaction, with awards in 3 of these fields.  She serves as Past President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences, Senior member of IEEE, Executive Editor of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, and Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies. In her professional service, she has taken the opportunity to build bridges between research communities that foster multi-disciplinary collaborations.  In that capacity, she has served as Founding Chair of the International Alliance to Advance Learning in the Digital Era.

Nikol Rummel
Professor of Educational Psychology, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany 
Adjunct Professor at the Human Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: https://ife.rub.de/pp/team/nikol-rummel 
Year of induction: 2019

Nikol Rummel is a Full Professor of Educational Psychology in the Institute of Educational Research at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA. Nikol completed both her Diploma in Psychology, her Ph.D., as well as her “Habilitation” (postdoctoral thesis) at the University of Freiburg, Germany. She also holds a Master’s degree in Educational Psychology from the University of Wisconsin -Madison. One of her main research interests is on developing and evaluating instructional support for collaborative learning, with a focus on computer-supported settings (CSCL) and on adaptive collaborative learning support. Another focus of her work is on developing methods for automated analyses of process data combining multiple data sources. Furthermore, she works on the assistance dilemma, that is, on the question of when to withhold and when to provide instruction in order to optimally support learning. She is elected member of the Board of Directors (2013-2019) and past president (2016-17) of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).  She is Associate Editor of Instructional Science, and Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, of the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, and of Learning & Instruction. Nikol has published over 40 journal articles in leading international research journals, as well as over 100 refereed book chapters and conference papers.

William Sandoval
Professor, Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website:https://www.researchgate.net/profile/William_Sandoval 
Year of induction: 2019

William A. Sandoval studied Computer Science at the University of New Mexico, and earned his Ph.D. in the Learning Sciences from Northwestern University in 1998. His research focuses on epistemic cognition – how people think about what and how they know. He is especially interested in how science learning in school can promote a deep understanding of scientific argument that supports productive engagement with science in public life. He edited (with Jeffrey Greene and Ivar Bråten) the first International Handbook of Epistemic Cognition. He has published and presented internationally in science education, educational psychology, and the learning sciences. He served as associate editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences for several years, and continues to serve on the editorial boards of JLSCognition & InstructionEducational Psychologist, and Science Education. He served on the National Research Council study panel that produced America’s Lab Report in 2005, and regularly advises various science education groups. Prof. Sandoval is as an expert on educational design research, most widely recognized for developing the now popular technique of conjecture mapping. He chaired the ISLS Conference Committee from 2009-2016, was elected to the ISLS Board of Directors in 2011, and served as the Society’s president in 2017-18. He is also a member of the American Educational Research Association, the National Association of Research on Science Teaching, the American Psychological Association, and is a Fellow of the International Society of Design and Development in Education.

Gerry Stahl
Professor Emeritus in Computing and Informatics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: http://gerrystahl.net
Year of induction: 2017
 

  • Gerry Stahl explores the potential of extending cognition from individuals to knowledge building by small groups. Can groups conduct various forms of cognition—such as thinking about mathematical problems—as groups? How can groups learn to think collaboratively? How can networked computational devices support this? What are the theoretical, pedagogical, technological and research aspects of this effort? His research has put students in groups and recorded their interactions in detail to explore such issues. He has documented that groups can think, but only when carefully nurtured.
  • Gerry Stahl studied philosophy and computer science at MIT, Northwestern, Heidelberg, Frankfurt and Colorado. Introduced to CSCL by Gerhard Fischer and Timothy Koschmann at Boulder. Active in every CSCL conference from 1995 through 2015; Program Chair of CSCL 2002. Attended every ICLS conference from 1998 to 2014. Founding Board member of ISLS. Directed the Virtual Math Teams (VMT) research project at the Math Forum 2002-2014. Co-authored “CSCL: An Historical Perspective” with Tim Koschmann and Dan Suthers. Published five books on CSCL: Group Cognition: Computer Support for Building Collaborative Knowledge”, Studying Virtual Math Teams”, Translating Euclid: Designing a Human-centered Mathematics”, Constructing Dynamic Triangles Together: The Development of Mathematical Group Cognition”, Theoretical Investigations: Philosophical Foundations of Group Cognition.” Self-published e-library of 16 volumes of essays on social philosophy, educational software design, interaction analysis, sculpture, etc. (available at http://gerrystahl.net/elibrary ). Founded and edited the International Journal of CSCL from 2006 through 2015. Taught CSCL and software design at Colorado and Drexel Universities. Retired 2014.

Susan Yoon
Professor of Education, Learning Sciences and Science Education, University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. website: https://scholar.gse.upenn.edu/yoon
Year of induction: 2019

Susan Yoon, PhD, is Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her PhD from the University of Toronto in 2005. She has research interests in science and technology education, complex systems, social network and social capital applications for learning. Her work spans both formal and informal science and technology environments where she has developed tools, curricula, and PD activities to support sense making through visualization tools, socioscientific sensibilities, and decision-making about science in real world contexts. She has researched the affordances of wearable and mobile technologies, MOOC platforms for collaborative PD, augmented reality technologies, digital knowledge-building platforms, and agent-based computer simulations that support STEM content learning and participation. Her most recent project in conjunction with the Perelman School of Medicine at Penn investigates how to incorporate research in the field of biomedical informatics into high school environmental science curriculum to engage students in local scientific action. She is the recipient of the 2009 AERA Division C Jan Hawkins Award for early career contributions. She has served on several ISLS committees including as Membership Committee Chair (2013­–2017); Education Committee member (2009–2017); Publications Committee member (2017–present); NAPLeS advisory board (2010–2018); and CSCL 2017 Conference Co-Chair. She has also co-chaired several ISLS Early Career Workshops and Doctoral Consortia (2017, 2012, 2010)  She sits on the ISLS Board of Directors for the term 2013–2019 and is co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Learning Sciences for the period 2017–2020.

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