ISLS Fellows

The ISLS Fellows program recognizes those who have made major contributions to the field of the Learning Sciences since its inception nearly three decades ago. These individuals are each highly accomplished scholars and community members who will continue to serve in critical roles for the society in the future through their continued leadership and mentorship activities. The formal announcement of the Fellows program took place on June 22, 2017 at the 2017 Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) conference in Philadelphia, one of two biennial academic research conferences sponsored by ISLS.

The inaugural cohort of fellows consisted distinguished learning scientists who have served previously as elected presidents of the society, editors of the two flagship journals (Journal of the Learning Sciences and International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning), and founders of the field.

New fellows are named in subsequent years through a selection committee consisting of existing ISLS fellows.

List of Fellows

Inaugural Fellows: 2017

Additionally, Naomi Miyake (1949-2015) (University of Tokyo) has been named an inaugural fellow in memoriam as part of the inaugural cohort.

2018 Inductees

2019 Inductees

2020 Inductees

2021 Inductees

2022 Inductees

2023 Inductees

2024 Inductees

Biographies

Brigid Barron headshot

Brigid Barron

Margaret Jacks Professor of Education and the Learning Sciences at Stanford Graduate School of Education

Year of induction: 2023

Brigid Barron is the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education and the Learning Sciences at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education. Her research investigates the dynamics of interest-driven learning ecologies to better understand how access to diverse opportunities across home, school, and community settings can support sustained engagement in meaningful activities over time.  She takes an ecological approach to understand social and relational aspects of learning pathways with a focus on how caregivers and educators catalyze learning by brokering access to resources, collaborating, and coordinating activities across time.  These inquiries include a focus on how digital technologies might be leveraged to provide more equitable access to high-quality content and supportive communities with the goal of informing the development of educational practices, policies, and interventions that effectively foster and nurture meaningful and fulfilling learning experiences.  Her current research focuses on understanding how caregivers, children, and educators co-designed supportive learning arrangements at home during the COVID-19 crisis with the goal of amplifying innovative practices as well as understanding system breakdowns.  At Stanford she teaches in the Learning Design and Technology MA program, the Learning Sciences and Technology Design doctoral program and the Developmental and Psychological Sciences doctoral program and directs the YouthLAB (Youth Learning Across Boundaries) research group (https://youthlab.stanford.edu/). She is on the editorial boards of the Journal of the Learning Sciences and Cognition and Instruction.  Dr. Barron received her doctorate from Vanderbilt University in Developmental and Clinical Psychology, was a National Academy and Spencer Foundation post-doctoral fellow, and a recipient of National Science Foundation CAREER award.

Carol Chan

Carol Chan

Honorary Professor at the Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong

Year of induction: 2024

Carol Chan is an Honorary Professor at the Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong (HKU). She has served as a Co-Convenor of the Science of Learning Strategic Theme at HKU, advancing interdisciplinary research in learning across university faculties. Her research focuses on knowledge building as knowledge creation, designing and examining how learners advance community knowledge supported by collaborative technology. Her research contribution includes three interrelated areas: (1) Designing and assessing knowledge building using reflective assessment and collaborative analytics, (2) Examining epistemologies and socio- cognitive-emotional dynamics of knowledge building, theorizing meta-discourse in collaboration, and (3) Examining contextual-cultural-equity issues, designing knowledge building for marginalized students and creating multi-level collaboration with teacher networks and knowledge-building communities. She has published extensively in high-impact journals indexed by SSCI, with a high Google citation impact, and co-edited The International Handbook of Collaborative Learning. She serves as an associate editor of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (ijCSCL) and as an editorial board member of the Journal of Learning Sciences, currently serving on the JLS Outstanding Paper Committee. She was a Research Leader, mentoring junior colleagues at the Faculty, and she frequently serves as a mentor for Doctoral Consortia and Early Career workshops for the ISLS community. She is a recipient of the Faculty Outstanding Graduate Student Supervisor and University Teaching Fellow awards.
Clark Chinn

Clark Chinn

Professor at the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University—New Brunswick

Year of induction: 2022

Clark Chinn is a Professor at the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University—New Brunswick.  His research focuses on epistemic cognition, reasoning and argumentation, learning from multiple documents, learning through inquiry, and collaborative learning. His most recent work has focused on how to promote the goals of epistemic education—education that improves students’ ways of knowing and thinking—with a particular focus on promoting better thinking in our so-called “post-truth” world.  He has also worked extensively on model-based inquiry in middle-school science classes—designing learning environments and investigating how these environments promote conceptual change and epistemic growth. He was Editor of the journal Educational Psychologist from 2011 to 2015.  He is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association and of the American Psychological Association (Division 15—Educational Psychology). He has co-edited several books, most recently the International Handbook of Inquiry and Learning.

Allan Collins

Allan Collins

Professor Emeritus of Learning Sciences, Northwestern University

 [email protected]
 https://allancollins.northwestern.edu
Year of induction: 2021

Dr. Allan Collins is Professor Emeritus of Learning Sciences at Northwestern University. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the Cognitive Science Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Educational Research Association. He served as a founding editor of the journal Cognitive Science and as first chair of the Cognitive Science Society. He is best known in psychology for his work on semantic memory and mental models, in artificial intelligence for his work on plausible reasoning and intelligent tutoring systems, and in education for his work on inquiry teaching, cognitive apprenticeship, situated learning, design research, epistemic forms and games, and systemic validity in educational testing. From 1991 to 1994 he was Co-Director of the US Department of Education’s Center for Technology in Education. His book with Richard Halverson, entitled Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America, was published by Teachers College Press in 2009, with a second edition in 2018. His latest book What’s Worth Teaching: Rethinking Curriculum in the Age of Technology was published by Teachers College Press in 2017.
Ulrike_Cress_

Ulrike Cress

Full-professor, University of Tübingen, Department of Psychology

Year of induction: 2022

Ulrike Cress studied psychology, received her doctorate in 2000 and her habilitation at the University of Tübingen in 2006. Since 2008 is a full-professor at the University of Tübingen in the Department of Psychology and since 2017 she is director of the Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (Knowledge Media Reseach Center).  With her Knowledge Construction Lab at the IWM her research focuses on social and cognitive psychological processes that are relevant to the collaborative construction and use of knowledge. Much of her work serves to further develop the cognitive-systemic “co-evolution model for individual learning and collaborative knowledge construction” presented in 2008 with Joachim Kimmerle. It is used, for example, in mass collaboration (e.g., collaborative writing in Wikipedia), in science communication, or in participatory decision making by doctors and patients. Ulrike Cress conducted numerous projects on the range of topics related to digital learning in schools and universities, as well as on informal learning contexts such as citizen science, search as learning, or knowledge construction with social media. These have been funded by the EU, DFG, BMBF, the states BW, NRW, HE and the Leibniz competition. Ulrike Cress has published more than 150 peer-reviewed journal articles and edited 9 books, including the International Handbook of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning published in 2021. Furthermore, she is executive co-editor of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Learning.

JoshuaDanish

Joshua A. Danish

Barbara B. Jacobs Chair in Education and Technology and Professor of Learning Sciences in the School of Education of Indiana University

Year of induction: 2024

Dr. Joshua Danish is the Barbara B. Jacobs Chair in Education and Technology and Professor
of Learning Sciences in the School of Education of Indiana University. His research focuses on
the role of representations–from drawings to skits to computer models–in supporting cognition
and learning. He also draws on the role of play and embodiment in supporting learners as they
represent their ideas. Interaction analysis and activity theory provide a bridge between
representation and play in Danish’s work, which explores how learners help to shape their
activity systems at the same time that their actions are shaped by those very systems. Danish
often designs new software tools to anchor the play teachers and learners engage in as they
explore complex concepts in new ways.

As a past President, Financial Officer, and Board Member of the ISLS, Danish is passionate
about building an increasingly more diverse and inclusive society. He received his B.S. in
Computer Science from Johns Hopkins University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of
California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He also spent 7 years as a software engineer, designer, and
producer in the commercial Educational Software Industry.

Pierre Dillenbourg

Pierre Dillenbourg

Prof. of Learning Technologies, School of Computer & Communication Sciences, Swiss federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL)

 [email protected]
 https://people.epfl.ch/pierre.dillenbourg
Year of induction: 2017

A former teacher in elementary school, Pierre Dillenbourg graduated in educational science (University of Mons, Belgium). He started his research on learning technologies in 1984. He obtained a PhD in computer science from the University of Lancaster (UK), in the domain of artificial intelligence applications for education. He has been assistant professor at the University of Geneva. He joined EPFL in 2002. He has been the academic director of Center for Digital Education, which implements the MOOC strategy of EPFL (over 2 million registrations). He is full professor in learning technologies in the School of Computer & Communication Sciences, where he is the head of the CHILI Lab: “Computer-Human Interaction for Learning & Instruction”. He is the director of the leading house DUAL-T, which develops technologies for dual vocational education systems (carpenters, florists, etc.). With EPFL colleagues, he launched in 2017 the Swiss EdTech Collider, an incubator with 70 start-ups in learning technologies. In 2018, he co-founded LEARN, the EPFL Center of Learning Sciences that brings together the local initiatives in educational innovation.

Noel Enyedy

Noel Enyedy

Professor of Science Education at the Peabody College at Vanderbilt University

Year of induction: 2024

Noel Enyedy is a Professor of Science Education at the Peabody College at Vanderbilt University. Professor Enyedy studies how people learn through social interaction. He often engages in Design-Based-Research to create playful teaching and learning contexts and strives to understand how learning is organized from video recordings. For the last 15 years, Enyedy has been designing mixed reality environments—where the physical motion of children moving around a room is used as the input for a computer simulation where students learn by becoming the phenomenon they are studying. The intent of the mixed reality ‘participatory simulations’ is to spark conversations between students and support instructional conversations in productive ways. While expanding the ways that children can learn through embodied play, social interaction is always at the center of his analyses.
Bat Sheva Eylon

Bat-Sheva Eylon

Professor Emeritus, Science Teaching Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

 [email protected]
 http://www.weizmann.ac.il/ScienceTeaching/Eylon
Year of induction: 2021

Bat-Sheva Eylon is a Professor (emeritus) in the Science Teaching Department at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. She headed the department from 2007 to 2015. She holds an MSc in physics from the Weizmann Institute and a PhD in Science Education from the University of California at Berkeley. She was later a Fulbright visiting scholar in Berkeley and Carnegie-Mellon. Bat-Sheva is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a recipient of the 2015 Israel EMET Prize in Social Science. Her main research areas are the learning and teaching of physics in high-school and integrated science in middle-school, and the continuing professional development of teachers in these areas all of which reflect her strong belief in research-practice-partnerships (RPP) and in research on designs that advance RPP collaborations. With peers, many of whom were her graduate students, she designed and conducted a variety of large-scale research-based educational frameworks such as the national networks of Professional Learning Communities for science and physics teachers (where studying the professional growth of the teacher-leaders of these communities was emphasized), the Rothschild-Weizmann MSc “Program for Excellence in Science Teaching” for acting teachers, and the PeTeL digital environment, empowering teachers’ collaborations and functioning as producers, consumers, and designers of Personalized Teaching and Learning. To influence national policy Eylon chaired and participated in committees on science and teacher education. The Knowledge-Integration perspective, developed with Linn and collaborators, has played an important role in all these endeavors (Linn & Eylon, 2011, Chinese Translation, 2015).
Frank Fischer

Frank Fischer

Professor for Education and Educational Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

 [email protected]
 http://www.psy.lmu.de/ffp_en/persons/professoren/fischer-frank
Year of induction: 2017

Frank Fischer is a full professor of Educational Science and Educational Psychology at the University of Munich. He is the speaker of the Munich Center of the Learning Sciences, an interdisciplinary collaboration of more than 30 research groups focusing on advancing research on learning “from cortex to community”. He served as President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences. His research focuses on how people learn to engage in scientific reasoning and argumentation, as well as in diagnostic reasoning. Settings include computer-supported collaborative learning and simulation-based learning environments in secondary school and in higher education. With respect to guidance he is interested in how collaboration scripts can make social interaction more beneficial for learning. He was an associate editor for the American Educational Research Journal and is on the editorial boards of several international journals, including Learning and Instruction, Journal of the Learning Sciences and Educational Psychologist. He has edited 15 books and special issues and published more than 125 journal articles and book chapters.

Barry Fishman

Barry Fishman

Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Professor of Learning Technologies, School of Information and School of Education, The University of Michigan

 [email protected]
 http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fishman
Year of induction: 2018

Barry Fishman is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Learning Technologies in the University of Michigan School of Information and School of Education. His research focuses on: video games as models for learning environments, teacher learning and the role of technology in supporting teacher learning, and the development of usable, scalable, and sustainable learning innovations through design-based implementation research (http://learndbir.org), which he helped to establish. He is also the co-creator of GradeCraft, a game-inspired learning management system (https://gradecraft.com). Dr. Fishman currently serves as Innovator-In-Residence at the University of Michigan Office of Academic Innovation. He is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education. He was co-author of the Obama Administration’s 2010 U.S. National Educational Technology Plan, and served as Associate Editor of The Journal of the Learning Sciences from 2005-2012. In 2017, Dr. Fishman was named the Michigan Association of State Universities “Distinguished Professor of the Year.” He received the 2016 “Campus Technology Innovator of the Year Award” for work with GradeCraft, was the 2010 recipient of the Provost’s Teaching Innovation Prize, the 2003 Pattishall Junior Faculty Research Award, and was the 2001 recipient of the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies from the American Educational Research Association. He received his A.B. from Brown University in English and American Literature in 1989, his M.S. from Indiana University in Instructional Systems Technology in 1992, and his Ph.D. in Learning Sciences from Northwestern University in 1996.

Susan Goldman

Susan R. Goldman

Distinguished Professor, Learning Sciences Research Institute Co-Director, University of Illinois at Chicago

 [email protected]
 https://education.uic.edu/profiles/susan-goldman
Year of induction: 2017

Susan R. Goldman, (PhD., University of Pittsburgh) is Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Psychology, and Education, and Co-Director of the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She conducts research on learning, instruction, assessment, and roles for technology. Most recently, she has focused on understanding the literacy demands in different academic disciplines and the implications of these demands for supporting learning, especially in adolescents (www.projectreadi.org). This work expanded to a focus on how teachers learn to engage in the forms of instruction called for by literacy, mathematics, and science programs that are consistent with the deep learning needed to meet the demands of the 21st century. She collaborates with educational practitioners to bridge research and practice. She is a member of the National Academy of Education, an Inaugural Fellow of the Society for Text and Discourse and of the International Society of the Learning Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She served on the ISLS Board of Directors from 2009–2015, and as its President in 2012–2013. She is Executive Officer of the ISLS 2016–2021. She has also served on the Board of Directors of the Society for Text and Discourse from its founding until 2007 and as the third President from 2000–2007. Goldman has held Associate Editor positions for Discourse Processes (1998–2010), the Journal of Educational Psychology (2007–2012), and is on the editorial board of the Journal of the Learning Sciences.

KimGomez

Kim Gomez

Professor, School of Education & Information Studies, UCLA

Year of induction: 2022

Kim Gomez is Professor in the School of Education & Information Studies at UCLA. She leverages design-based and impact-focused research methodologies to study and support literate practices in STEM teaching and learning with the aim of supporting more socially just and equitably focused designed tools and contexts. In 2019 she was awarded an 18-month NSF CS for All funding as a part of the Researcher-Practitioner Partnership (RPP) program the focus of which was the co-design of effective problem-solving pedagogy practices in elementary CS classes. The work introduced an extension of the conjecture map conceptual tool, by adding equity conjectures to the mapping.  The equity conjectures supported conceptualization, and co-design of the CS lesson templates. 

Currently, she is a Co-PI (with June Ahn) on a 3-year W.T. Grant Foundation funded study of the use of research evidence in working within RPPs. With Ahn, she is attending to anti-racist processes and structural features of RPPs. In this work, they aim to illustrate the potential of RPPs for addressing persistent systemic K-12 educational inequities. From 2011-2019, Dr. Gomez was a Senior Fellow for Literacy and Language at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She supported the co-design of literacy supports in developmental mathematics curricula. She has been awarded funding from the W.T. Grant, Spencer, Joyce Family, and MacArthur Foundations, among others. The author of over 60 publications, she has received numerous awards, including the Harold A. and Lois Haytin Faculty Award from UCLA for her collaborative work with practitioners.

 

LouisGomez

Louis Gomez

Professor, School of Education & Information Studies, UCLA-Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

Year of induction: 2022

Louis Gomez is a learning scientist dedicated to educational improvement. His research and design efforts are aimed at helping to support community formation in schools, and other organizations, so that they can collaboratively create new approaches to teaching, learning and assessment. With colleagues, he has worked to bring Improvement Science to the field of Education. This work is aimed at helping the field take a new perspective on design, educational engineering, and development efforts that catalyze long-term, cooperative initiatives. These initiatives move through repeated cycles of problem diagnosis, design, assessment, and redesign, all organized around problems associated with the day-to-day work of teaching and learning in educational institutions. The work gains much of its power because it is carried out in highly focused collaboratives that Gomez and colleagues call Networked Improvement Communities. Gomez received the bachelor’s degree in psychology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1974 and a doctorate in cognitive psychology, in 1979, from UC Berkeley. Louis Gomez currently serves as Professor of Education and Information Studies at UCLA and as a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Melissa Gresalfi headshot

Melissa Gresalfi

Professor of Mathematics Education and the Learning Sciences and Dean of Residential Colleges and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University


Year of induction: 2023

Melissa Gresalfi is a professor of Mathematics Education and the Learning Sciences, and Dean of Residential Colleges and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University.  Her research considers how to design learning environments that support students’ empowered engagement with mathematics. Her projects explore how tasks, social interactions, norms, and broader narratives support student learning and identity. These projects share a commitment to understand how classroom structures and curricular designs create (or limit) opportunities for students to engage meaningfully with information. Her research is published in journals such as Educational Studies in Mathematics, the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, The Journal of the Learning Sciences, and Computers and Education. She has served as Associate Editor of the American Educational Research Journal and the Journal of the Learning Sciences. She was awarded the Jan Hawkins Early Career award by Division C of the American Educational Research Association, and was a postdoctoral fellow for the National Academy of Education. Gresalfi has served as PI or co-PI on numerous grants funded through the Gates Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences, the MacArthur Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the Spencer Foundation. She received her B.A. from Franklin and Marshall College in Psychology and French, and her M.A. in Education and PhD in Educational Psychology from Stanford University.

Kris Gutierrez

Kris Gutiérrez

Carol Liu Professor at the Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley

[email protected]
https://gse.berkeley.edu/kris-d-gutiérrez
Year of induction: 2021

Kris D. Gutiérrez is the Carol Liu Professor at the Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley. Gutiérrez brings a critical approach to her work in the learning sciences, literacy, educational policy, and qualitative, and design-based approaches to inquiry. Gutiérrez is a member of the National Academy of Education, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of AERA, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. She is past president of the American Educational Research Association and was appointed by President Obama to the National Board for the Institute of Education Sciences, for which she served as vice-chair. Gutiérrez’s research examines learning in designed environments, with attention to students from nondominant communities and translingual populations. Her general focus is on the cultural dimensions of learning. Her work on Third Spaces examines the affordances of syncretic approaches to learning, digital and STEM learning, and the re-mediation of functional systems of learning. Her work in social design experiments offers a utopian methodology that foregrounds the political and ethnical dimensions of design research and are concerned with possible futures. Gutiérrez awards include the AERA Division C Sylvia Scribner Award for influencing the field of learning and instruction, the 2016 Oscar Causey award for influencing the field of literacy, the 2016 Medal of Excellence from the Columbia University/Teachers College, the 2014 Distinguished Contributions to Social Contexts in Education Research – Lifetime Achievement Award and the 2014 Henry T. Trueba Award for Research Leading to the Transformation of the Social Contexts of Education.
Rogers Hall

Rogers Hall

Wachtmeister Professor of Education, Vanderbilt University

[email protected]
https://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/bio/rogers-hall
Year of induction: 2020

Rogers Hall is Wachtmeister Professor of Education at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on diverse STEM conceptual practices, using comparative analysis to follow learning as embodied and historical activity. He designs experimental learning environments for new modes of engagement in these practices, while co-directing the Space, Learning and Mobility (SLaM) Lab, where he has contributed to design studies of learning:

  • in ensemble and embodied activity (e.g., “walking scale geometry” and dance choreography for mathematics learning),
  • when mobility is both the means and content of what is learned (e.g., youth mobility and counter mapping, shaping engagement during family museum visits),
  • by making and following “story lines” that share public history as walking tours (e.g., digital spatial storytelling in classrooms and a community museum),
  • by reflecting on relations between personal geography and thematic maps that model historical and social distribution (e.g., telling stories with open, large-scale data and mapping self in society), and
  • through hearing and listening in popular culture (e.g., close listening and soundscaping).

Hall holds a Ph.D. in computer science from UC Irvine (1990). He taught at UC Berkeley before joining the Vanderbilt faculty. He is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association and of the International Society of the Learning Sciences. Hall was a residential fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences (Stanford University, 2007-2008), the UC Humanities Research Institute (2001), and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (1999). He was also a NAE/Spencer Foundation and McDonnell Foundation postdoctoral fellow (1996-1997).

Erica Halverson

Erica Halverson

Gibb Faculty Fellow of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Year of induction: 2024

Erica Rosenfeld Halverson is the Gibb Faculty Fellow of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Erica has dedicated her career to understanding how people learn in and through the arts. Her work has explored a range of art forms including theatre, film, digital art, podcasting, and making – across these practices she has shown that art-making is a process of conceiving, representing, and sharing complex ideas and how this process affords identity work through learning. In her 2021 book, “How the Arts Can Save Education,” Erica argues that arts practices should transform teaching, learning, and the design of learning environments across the learning ecology. The arts allow us to take a fundamentally asset-focused perspective on young people, creating equitable, culturally sustaining learning environments for all. Erica recently completed a study for the Wallace Foundation on out-of-school-time youth arts organizations that support historically marginalized young people which has resulted in a policy paper for arts education (Halverson, Saplan & Martin, 2023) and a learning sciences-focused approach to OST, “What We Learn About Learning From Out-of-School-Time Arts Education” (Halverson, Saplan, Mejias, & Martin, 2024). She is Co-PI on a National Endowment for the Arts Research Lab focused on artist-in-residence programs and their role in social emotional learning for students and teachers. She is the founder of two community arts outreach programs – Playmakers Lab in Chicago and Whoopensocker in Madison, WI – both of which put her empirical insights into action. She is host of the podcast “Arts Educators Save the World,” where Erica talks with successful artists and their mentors about the impact that arts education has had on both their lives. www.ericahalverson.com.
Friedrich Hesse

Friedrich W. Hesse

Founding Director, Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Tuebingen

 [email protected]
 https://www.iwm-tuebingen.de/www/personen/ma.html?uid=fhesse
Year of induction: 2017

Friedrich Hesse is Founding Director of the Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM) and at present head of the Knowledge Exchange Lab. He is Scientific Vice-President of the Leibniz Association (an umbrella organization for 93 research institutes in Germany) and is holding the Chair of the Department for Applied Cognitive- and Media Psychology at the University of Tuebingen. Friedrich Hesse has been initiator and speaker for the first Virtual Graduate School Knowledge acquisition and knowledge exchange with new media funded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Society, DFG), the DFG-Priority Programme Netbased Knowledge Communication, the DFG-Research Group Analysis and Promotion of Effective Processes of Learning and Instruction and the first Leibniz-ScienceCampus Informational Environments. Friedrich W. Hesse studied psychology at the Universities of Marburg and Duesseldorf, received his doctorate at the RWTH Aachen and qualified as Professor of Psychology at the University of Goettingen. He was research fellow at the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) and at the Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. He was Head of the Department of Applied Cognitive Science at the German Institute of Research for Distance Education (DIFF) and for two years director at the Laboratoire Européen de Recherche sur les Apprentissages et les Nouvelles Technologies (LERANT) in Frankreich funded by CNRS.

Cindy Hmelo-Silver

Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver

Barbara B. Jacobs Chair in Education and Technology Professor of Learning Sciences, Indiana University

[email protected]
 https://education.indiana.edu/about/directory/profiles/hmelo-silver-cindy.html
Year of induction: 2017

Dr. Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver is the Barbara B. Jacobs Chair in Education and Technology, Professor of Learning Sciences, and Director of the Center for Research on Learning and Technology in the School of Education of Indiana University. She received her Ph.D. in Cognitive Studies from Vanderbilt University. Her research interests focus on how people learn about complex phenomena and how technology can help support that learning. As part of this work, she studies problem-based learning, collaborative engagement, social knowledge construction, and computer supported collaborative learning. Current projects focus on developing adaptive support for collaborative inquiry for students and support for teachers in orchestrating collaborative inquiry.

Dr. Hmelo-Silver is an ISLS inaugural fellow as well as being a fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She is a past president of the International Society for Learning Sciences as well as being a past editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences, currently Associate Editor of Instructional Science and she serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. She has co-edited several books, most recently the International Handbook of the Learning Sciences.

Chris Hoadley

Chris Hoadley

Associate Professor, New York University

 [email protected]
 http://www.tophe.net
Year of induction: 2017

Dr. Chris Hoadley is associate professor in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. His research focuses on collaborative technologies for learning and human flourishing, computer support for cooperative learning (CSCL), and design-based research methods, a term he coined in the late 1990s. Hoadley is the director of dolcelab, the Laboratory for Design Of Learning, Collaboration & Experience. He is a fellow of the International Society for the Learning Sciences (ISLS) and was an affiliate scholar for the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for the Advancement of Scholarship in Engineering Education (CASEE), and was a Fulbright Scholar in India and Nepal. From 2011–2013, he was program director of the Educational Technology programs at NYU and founding program director of the Games for Learning program, and on the founding faculty presidium of MAGNET, the NYU Media And Games Network. From 2013–2016, he was on loan to the National Science Foundation as the program director in charge of the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program in the Directorate of Computer and Information Science and Engineering and the Directorate of Education and Human Resources Division of Research on Learning. Hoadley previously chaired the American Educational Research Association’s Special Interest Group for Education in Science and Technology (now SIG: Learning Sciences), and served as the co-founder and first president of the International Society for the Learning Sciences.

Ulriche Hoppe Headshot

Ulrich Hoppe

Full Professor of “Collaborative and Learning Support Systems” (Computer Science) at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), Germany

Year of induction: 2023

Ulrich Hoppe is a full professor of “Collaborative and Learning Support Systems” (Computer Science) at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), Germany. He has completed his active service for UDE in August 2020 but remains affiliated as a professor there. With his research group COLLIDE, he participated in more than ten European projects on Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL). In 1998, he started the NIMIS project that implemented a computer-integrated classroom environ­ment featuring a combination of innovative interaction techniques (including pen-based and speech technologies) with intelligent analysis and support. Later, he was one of the initiators and coordinators of the EU Network of Excellence “Kaleidoscope” (2004-07) that comprised the major European research groups in the field of TEL. From 2015 to 2020, Ulrich Hoppe has been a principal investigator in a Research Training Group on “User Centred Social Media” funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). His research is focused on computational techniques for learning and knowledge building, including network analysis techniques and data mining methods applied to the study and support of online communities. Ulrich Hoppe is a Fellow of the Asia-Pacific Society of Computers in Education. He has served on the ISLS Board of Directors from 2017-23 and was a co-organizer of the first ISLS Annual Meeting hosted by Ruhr University Bochum in 2021. He is currently serving a one-year term as a visiting professor at Kyoto University (Japan).

Ilana Horn Headshot

Ilana Horn

Professor of Mathematics Education at Vanderbilt University

Year of induction: 2023

Ilana (Lani) Horn is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Vanderbilt University. Her research centers on ways to make authentic mathematics accessible to students, particularly those who have been historically and contemporarily disenfranchised by educational systems. Placing mathematics teachers at the center of this work, she looks at classroom practices that engage the most students in high quality mathematics. Crucially, she views teaching as a situated practice, examining in how school environments, communities, colleagues, and policies shape what is instructionally possible. In this way, her scholarship lies at the intersection of mathematics education, learning sciences, and sociology of teachers’ work. Her research projects have spanned questions of in-service teachers’ professional learning, pre-service education, district level instructional improvement, and students’ experiences of different forms of mathematics instruction. These projects implicate the way teachers’ work is organized toward the goal of supporting meaningful mathematics instruction for students. Over the years, her work has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the Carnegie Foundation. She has served as an Associate Editor at the Journal of Learning Sciences since 2020, co-hosted an ISLS conference (2020), was a Visiting Scholar in Learning Sciences at the University of Haifa (2013), and a Visiting Scholar in Teacher Education at Leiden University (2018).

Noora Slotte / Studio P.S.V.

Sanna Järvelä

Professor in learning sciences and head of the Learning and Educational Technology Research Unit (LET) in the University of Oulu, Finland

Year of induction: 2022

Sanna Järvelä is a professor in learning sciences and head of the Learning and Educational Technology Research Unit (LET) in the University of Oulu, Finland. Her research interests deal with self-regulated learning, computer supported collaborative learning and on-line learning processes. Järvelä and her research group is internationally recognized in theoretical and methodological advancement of social aspects of self-regulated learning (socially shared regulation in learning) and multimodal research methods. She has published over 180 scientific papers in international refereed journals and about 50 book chapters and three edited books. She has been an Associate Editor in Learning and Instruction and she is the co-Chief Editor in the International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning since 2019. Järvelä has been invited for the member of the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters in 2015 and she is the past European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI) president. She is a member of the OECD PISA 2025 ‘Learning in the Digital World’ expert team and co-PI of the Center for Learning and Living with AI (CELLA) funded by Jacobs Foundation.

Heisawn Jeong

Heisawn Jeong

Full Professor of Psychology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, South Korea

[email protected]
Year of induction: 2021

Heisawn Jeong is a full professor of Psychology at the Hallym University located in Chuncheon, South Korea. She studied cognitive psychology at Seoul National University in Korea and received her PhD at the University of Pittsburgh in the US. Her research interests include collaborative learning, learning technology, research synthesis, interaction design and artificial intelligence. She has held an Associate Editor position for Korean Journal of Educational Psychology (2014–2018) and is on the editorial board of the International Journal of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning and Educational Researcher. She has co-chaired Doctoral Consortia and also served as a mentor in ICLS and CSCL conferences. She was a member of the ISLS Membership committee, Communications committee, and CSCL committee. She also served on the ISLS Board of Directors (2014–2021) and as its President (2019–2020).
Ton de Jong

Ton de Jong

Chair of the Department of instructional Technology, University of Twente

 [email protected]
http://users.edte.utwente.nl/jong
Year of induction: 2018

Ton de Jong holds a chair in Instructional Technology at the University of Twente, the Netherlands. He specializes in inquiry learning and collaborative learning (mainly in science domains) supported by technology. He was coordinator of several EU projects and several national projects including the ZAP project in which interactive games/simulations for psychology were developed. ZAPs commercial licences now exceed 80,000 in number. He was coordinator of the 7th framework Go-Lab project on learning with online laboratories in science and currently is coordinator of its H2020 follow-up project Next-Lab (see www.golabz.eu). He published over 200 journal articles and book chapters, was associate editor for the Journal of Engineering Education and for Instructional Science and currently is on the editorial board of eight journals. He has published papers in Science on inquiry learning with computer simulations (2006), design environments (2013), and virtual laboratories (2013). He is AERA fellow and was elected member of the Academia Europaea in 2014. He has been dean of the master programme Educational Science and Technology at the University of Twente.

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Susan Jurow

Professor of Learning Sciences & Human Development program at the University of Colorado, Boulder (U.S.A.)

Year of induction: 2022

A. Susan Jurow is currently a Professor of Learning Sciences & Human Development program at the University of Colorado, Boulder (U.S.A.), Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Community Engagement, and co-Editor in Chief of the Journal of the Learning Sciences (2021-2024).

Susan’s publications have focused on understanding what counts as consequential learning for people – in schools, in communities, and in institutions of higher education. She has studied mathematics learning in middle school classrooms, learning as part of progressive social movements for justice, and learning and “un-learning” related to organizing for equity in institutions of higher education. Across these diverse contexts, Susan and her remarkable collaborators have foregrounded people’s capacity to organize new futures while simultaneously struggling against entrenched systems of oppression. 

Susan values working side-by-side with partners – youth, community organizers, students, and colleagues – to challenge narrow conceptions of learning and to imagine new and transformative ways of knowing and being. It is her desire to support the ongoing development of the Learning Sciences to be fearless and focused in its work to understand, question, and re-organize learning so that we can embody our ethical responsibilities to each other.

Yasmin Kafai

Yasmin Kafai

Lori and Michael Milken President’s Distinguished Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania.

 [email protected]
 www.yasminkafai.com
Year of induction: 2017

Yasmin B. Kafai is a learning scientist and designer of online tools and communities to promote coding, crafting, and creativity across grades K–16. Her work empowers students to use computer programming to design games, sew electronic textiles, and grow applications in biology with the goal of supporting creative expression, building social connections, and broadening participation in computing. She helped develop with MIT colleagues the popular programming tool Scratch—known as the YouTube of interactive media—where millions of kids create and share their programs. With Exploring Computer Science, she has developed a high school curriculum with electronic textiles to introduce high school students to creative computing. In her recent book series on youth digital media published by MIT Press, she unveils the connections between playing online, learning programming, and making games for more constructive and creative participation in networked communities, see Connected Play: Tweens in a Virtual World,(with Deborah Fields), Connected Code: Why Children Need to Learn Programming and Connected Gaming: What Making Video Games Can Teach Us about Learning and Literacy, (both written with Quinn Burke). Her award-winning work has received generous funding from the National Science Foundation, Spencer Foundation, MacArthur Foundation and Google. She worked with Seymour Papert and Idit Harel at the MIT Media Laboratory from 1989–1994 and then joined the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association and the International Society of the Learning Sciences.

Yael Kali

Yael Kali

Professor of Technology Enhanced Learning, University of Haifa

[email protected]
http://yael-kali.edtech.haifa.ac.il
Year of induction: 2021

Yael Kali is a Professor of technology enhanced learning at the University of Haifa. She is the founding director of two Israeli centers of research excellence—Learning In a NetworKed Society (LINKS, 2012-2018) and Taking Citizen Science to School (TCSS, 2017-2023). Using design-based research and design-based implementation research, Kali explores technology-enhanced learning and teaching at various contexts and age levels, from junior high school to higher education, and as part of teacher professional development programs. Her work focuses on the role of design principles for supporting learning and collaborative design, especially within networks of research-practice partnerships. She has served as an Associate Editor for the journal Instructional Science from 2012 to 2020, and was a visiting scholar at the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning & Cognition, University of Sydney (2010-2011), and at the School of Education, University of Colorado Boulder (2018).
Paul Kirschner

Paul A. Kirschner

Distinguished University Professor and Professor of Educational Psychology and the Open University of the Netherlands.

 [email protected]
 www.ou.nl/zoek-medewerker#!user/PKI
Year of induction: 2017

Paul A. Kirschner, Dr.h.c. (1951) is Distinguished University Professor and professor of educational psychology at the Open University of the Netherlands as well as Visiting Professor of Education with a special emphasis on Learning and Interaction in Teacher Education at the University of Oulu, Finland. He is Research Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, the International Society of the Learning Sciences, and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Science. He is a past President (2010–2011) of the International Society for the Learning Sciences and a former member of the Dutch Educational Council and, as such, was advisor to the Minister of Education (2000–2004). He is also a member of the Scientific Technical Council of the Foundation for University Computing Facilities (SURF WTR), chief editor of Journal of Computer Assisted Learning and associate editor of Computers in Human Behavior. He is co-author of the recently released book Urban Myths about Learning and Education as well as of the highly successful book Ten steps to complex learning, and editor of two other books (Visualizing Argumentation and What we know about CSCL).

Timothy Koschmann

Timothy Koschmann

Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Medical Education, Southern Illinois University

 [email protected]
https://www.siumed.edu/dme/faculty/timothy-koschmann.html
Year of induction: 2017

Timothy Koschmann is a Professor Emeritus of Medical Education at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. He began his training in Philosophy (B.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City) going on to complete advanced degrees in Experimental Psychology (M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) and Computer Science (Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology, 1987). He was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Faculty of Education at Göteborg University in 2013.

Koschmann is a communication scholar with a special interest in practical organizations of instructing. Early in his career he took an avid interest in the possibilities for using technology to support collaboration and learning. This inevitably led to more foundational inquiries into precisely how understanding is displayed and monitored within interaction. He has done extensive fieldwork in settings in which physicians and surgeons do their work and receive their training. Koschmann uses digital video and other associated exhibits as aids in fixing events of interest for later reconstruction and analysis.

Nancy Law

Nancy Law

Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong

 [email protected]
https://web.edu.hku.hk/staff/academic/nlaw
Year of induction: 2019

Dr Nancy Law is a professor in the Division of Information Technology in Education, Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong. She served as the Founding Director for the Centre for Information Technology in Education (CITE) for 15 years from 1998. She also led the Science of Learning Strategic Research Theme at the University of Hong Kong. She is widely known known for her work in the integration of digital technology in learning and teaching to promote scalable student-centred pedagogical innovations. Her research interests include international comparative studies of technology-enabled learning innovations, models of ICT integration in schools and change leadership, computer supported collaborative learning, the use of expressive and exploratory computer-based learning environments, learning design and learning analytics. She received a Humanities and Social Sciences Prestigious Fellowship Scheme Award by the Hong Kong SAR Research Grants Council in 2014 in recognition of her outstanding research. She has served as an executive editor of the International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning since 2013.

Carol D Lee

Carol D. Lee

Professor Emeritus and the former Edwina S. Tarry Professor of Education, School of Education and Social Policy and in African-American Studies, Northwestern University

[email protected]
https://sites.northwestern.edu/carollee
Year of induction: 2021

Carol D. Lee is Professor Emeritus and the former Edwina S. Tarry Professor of Education in the School of Education and Social Policy and in African-American Studies at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. She is President-Elect of the National Academy of Education, a past president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), AERA’s past representative to the World Educational Research Association, past vice-president of Division G of AERA, past president of the National Conference on Research in Language and Literacy, and past co-chair of the Research Assembly of the National Council of Teachers of English. She is a member of the National Academy of Education, a fellow of the American Educational Research Association and the National Conference on Research in Language and Literacy, a former fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Reading Hall of Fame. She has received numerous awards including Distinguished Service Award from the National Council of Teachers of English, Scholars of Color Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Educational Research Association, the Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Illinois-Urbana, The President’s Pacesetters Award from the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education and an honorary doctorate from the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Her research addresses cultural supports for learning that include a broad ecological focus, with attention to language and literacy and African-American youth.
Victor Lee

Victor Lee

Associate Professor in Learning Sciences and Technology Design at Stanford University

Year of induction: 2022

Victor R. Lee is Associate Professor in Learning Sciences and Technology Design at Stanford University and Past-President (2020-2021) and Board Member (2015-2022) for ISLS and past-Chair of the Special Interest Group in Advanced Technologies for Learning for the American Educational Research Association (2010-2012). His research examines issues of STEM teaching and learning with specific focus on supporting learning with data in and out of school settings and integration of computational technologies into teaching and learning contexts that range from makerspaces to elementary computer science curricula. Previously, he was on the faculty for over ten years at Utah State University’s Department of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences. He has over 120 publications, including 50 peer reviewed journal articles and two edited learning sciences books. Lee also co-authored the National Academies 2021 consensus report Cultivating Interest in Competences in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. He received the Jan Hawkins Award from the American Educational Research Association, a National Science Foundation CAREER award, and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation postdoctoral fellowship. Lee earned his doctorate in Learning Sciences at Northwestern University and actively works to continue to grow and increase inclusion within the learning sciences community.

 

Oskar Lindwall Headshot

Oskar Lindwall

Professor in Communication at the Department of Applied IT at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Year of induction: 2023

Oskar Lindwall is a Professor in Communication at the Department of Applied IT at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Before that, he held a position in Education at the same university and he received PhD at the Department of Communication Studies at Linköping University. His major fields are Ethnomethodology, Conversation Analysis, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, and the Learning Sciences. Lindwall has led multiple research projects that explore various areas such as YouTube tutorials, dental education, surgical training, and feedback in higher education. He has also conducted research on conversational agents, lab work in science education, architect education, simulation training in medicine and maritime education, and the teaching and learning of craft. His central research topics revolve around the sequential organization of instruction, the sensitive nature of feedback, and the use of video for instruction and research. Recently (2023), he co-edited the volume Instructions and Instructed Action: The Situated Production, Reproduction, and Subversion of Social Order (Routledge). He was the Conference Chair of the 11th International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in 2015 and Chair of the ISLS Conference Committee from 2016-2020. He served on the ISLS Board of Directors from 2017-2023 and as its President from 2021-2022.

Marcia Linn

Marcia C. Linn

Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley

[email protected]
https://wise-research.berkeley.edu/mclinn
Year of induction: 2017

Marcia C. Linn is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Psychological Association(APA), the Association for Psychological Science (APS), the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).  She has served as President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), Chair of the AAAS Education Section, and on the boards of the AAAS, the Educational Testing Service Graduate Record Examination, the McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Studies in Education Practice, and the National Science Foundation Education and Human Resources Directorate. Awards include the National Association for Research in Science Teaching Award for Lifelong Distinguished Contributions to Science Education, the American Educational Research Association Willystine Goodsell Award, and the Council of Scientific Society Presidents first award for Excellence in Educational Research.

Linn earned her Ph.D. at Stanford University where she worked with Lee Cronbach. She spent a year in Geneva working with Jean Piaget, a year in Israel as a Fulbright Professor, and a year in London at University College. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences three times. Her books include Computers, Teachers, Peers (2000), Internet Environments for Science Education (2004), Designing Coherent Science Education (2008), WISE Science (2009), and Science Teaching and Learning: Taking Advantage of Technology to Promote Knowledge Integration (2011) [Chinese Translation, 2015]. She chairs the Technology, Education—Connections (TEC) series for Teachers College Press.

CheeKitLooi

Chee-Kit Looi

Professor of Education at the National Institute of Education (NIE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore

Year of induction: 2022

Chee-Kit Looi is Professor of Education at the National Institute of Education (NIE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. He was the founding Head of the Learning Sciences Lab, the first research centre devoted to the study of the sciences of learning in the Asia-Pacific region. He is currently the Co-Director of the Centre for Research and Development in Learning at NTU. His research interests are in the areas of computer-supported collaborative learning, seamless learning, and computational thinking. He is the PI or co-PI of several research projects funded by the National Research Foundation, Singapore.  His research has created significant inroads into transforming school practices: his work on rapid collaborative learning has created routine practices of collaborative work in ten schools. His research on seamless and mobile learning has created a model of 1:1 computing in schools and transformed the curricula of Primary 3 and 4 science in a primary school in Singapore so that they could harness the affordances of mobile devices for inquiry learning. Chee-Kit has published over a hundred journal articles in leading international research journals, as well as over two hundred refereed book chapters and conference papers. Chee-Kit served as an Associate Editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences from 2013-2016 and as program chair of ICLS 2016. He is a founding member as well as Fellow of the Asia-Pacific Society on Computers in Education. He is also a founding member of the Global Chinese Society of Computers in Education and served as its President from 2017 to 2019.

Sten Ludvigsen

Sten Ludvigsen

Professor of learning and digitalization, Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo

[email protected]
https://www.uv.uio.no/iped/english/people/aca/stenl
Year of induction: 2021

Sten Ludvigsen, Ph.D., is a professor in the field of learning and digitalization at the Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo. He is known for his contributions to the field of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) and for his contributions in learning sciences. He has contributed to several CSCL and technology enhanced learning handbooks. While design based research has been a major approach, many other research designs are being used to improve the understanding of learning and cognition in schools and other settings. Dr. Ludvigsen has as academic leader extensive experience in research and research education. From 2007–2008, he led the Kaleidoscope European Network of Excellence (NoE)’s Technology Enhanced Learning program. Additionally, from 2004–2009, he served as the director of InterMedia at the University of Oslo and, from 2008–2012, he was the scientific leader of the National Research School in Educational Science (NATED). In June 2013, he was appointed by the Norwegian Parliament to lead a public committee that studied the future of the Norwegian school system (K–12). The committee provided two reports (NOU 2014:7 and NOU 2015:8) to the Norwegian government that served as the basis for the Norwegian school system’s reform (1–13); this reform is known as the Subject Renewal Reform. He served as the editor-in-chief for the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (ijCSCL) from 2016–2019, becoming an honorary doctor at Gothenburg University in 2018, and acting as the Faculty of Education’s dean from 2017–2020.

Kris Lund, ISLS Fellow

Kristine Lund

Senior Research Engineer in the CNRS; Director of ASLAN: Advanced Studies on Language Complexity; Interactions, Corpora, Learning, and Representations Research lab, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon

[email protected]
http://www.icar.cnrs.fr/membre/klund
Year of induction: 2020

Kristine Lund’s research is driven by her interest in diverse perspectives on collaboration and learning for individuals, groups, and communities. She has studied argumentation and explanation as mechanisms for individual and collaborative knowledge construction from perspectives of learning sciences, psycholinguistics, and physics didactics, focusing respectively on socio-affective-cognitive conflicts, pragmatic competence, and embodied meaning-making. Her work on communities focuses on collaboration in science and the interdisciplinarity of research on education. Observing how an object of interest changes nature, depending on the vantage point from which it is studied led her to facilitate theoretical and methodological integration of team research on human interaction. She now directs the French laboratory of excellence ASLAN – Advanced Studies on Language Complexity https://aslan.universite-lyon.fr.

She holds a B.A. in Computer Science from Gustavus Adolphus College, an M.S. in Artificial Intelligence from Université de Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, a Ph.D. in Cognitive Science and an Habilitation in Education from Université Grenoble Alpes. She spent 2004-2005 at Robert Sternberg’s Center for the Psychology of Abilities, Competencies and Expertise (PACE) at Yale. She served on the ISLS Board of Directors (2010-2017) and chaired CSCL 2019 in Lyon. She chaired the Education Committee, and organized many Doctoral Consortia, Early and Mid-Career Workshops. She is Conference Committee co-chair, an Early Career Award Committee member, and an editorial board member of the International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning and the Journal of Learning Analytics. She is Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder of www.Cognik.net, focused on intuitive discovery of educational and musical content.

Jasmine Ma Headshot

Jasmine Ma

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Urban Education at New York University

Year of induction: 2023

the assumption that all individuals have the potential to engage in complex mathematics, and that students’ typical experiences in classroom mathematics make contact with just a small fraction of possibilities for learning, she is concerned with how dominant forms of mathematics instruction (and the assumption that Western mathematics is the only mathematics of value) actively and systematically marginalize particular populations of learners. Her scholarship investigates the mathematical activity and learning of youth and adults in and across out-of-school settings, attending to the many rich and powerful practices in which they already engage. Her approach is to develop more expansive conceptualizations of what counts as mathematics and of what might be considered resources for learning mathematics, in an effort to develop more equitable mathematics learning environments. This work, highlighting the agentic activity of young people, has involved theorizing bodies, space, and identity in mathematics and learning. Ma has served as Secretary for the International Society for the Learning Sciences since 2017, and on the Board since 2019. She is also an Executive Editor for Cognition and Instruction.

SusanMcKenney

Susan McKenney

Professor of Teacher Professionalization, School Development and Educational Technology, University of Twente

Year of induction: 2022

A former preschool teacher, Susan McKenney is Professor of Teacher Professionalization, School Development and Educational Technology at the University of Twente as well as Extraordinary Professor of Educational Technology at North-West University, South Africa. Her research focuses on understanding and facilitating the interplay between curriculum development and teacher professional development, and often emphasizes the supportive role of technology in these processes. As such, she also studies processes of design that can be applied in the field of education, and synergetic research-practice interactions. Since design-based (implementation) research lends itself to such synergies, her writing and teaching often provide ideas about how to conduct this exciting form of inquiry. Her book on this topic, Conducting Educational Design Research (co-authored with Tom Reeves), is now in its 2nd edition. Within the University of Twente’s Faculty of Behavioral, Management and Social Sciences, she has held multiple leadership positions, including chairing the faculty’s interdisciplinary research on Learning; directing the MSc program in Educational Science and Technology; directing Pro-U, Twente’s in-service education program for teachers; and chairing ELAN, the department of teacher professional development. Her international academic citizenship includes serving on the editorial boards of: Journal of the Learning Sciences, Instructional Science, Educational Design Research, Educational Designer, Journal of Research on Technology in Education, and Educational Technology Research & Development. She is fellow and past chair of the International Society for Design and Development in Education.

Nasir

Na’ilah Nasir

President of the Spencer Foundation

Year of induction: 2022

Na’ilah Suad Nasir is the sixth President of the Spencer Foundation, which funds education research nationally. Prior to joining Spencer, she held a faculty appointment in Education and African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley where she also served as the chair of African American Studies, then later as the Vice Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion. She also served on the Faculty of the Stanford Graduate School of Education.

Nasir’s research examines the racialized and cultural nature of learning and schooling, with a particular focus on the experiences of African American students in schools and communities. She recently co-edited The Handbook of the Cultural Foundations of Learning (Routledge) and We Dare Say Love: Supporting Achievement in the Educational Life of Black Boys. She is also the author of Racialized Identities: Race and achievement for African-American youth, published by the Stanford University Press in 2012. Nasir is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She is President (2021-2022) of the American Educational Research Association.

mitchell-nathan

Mitchell J. Nathan

Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Learning Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison

[email protected]
http://website.education.wisc.edu/~mnathan
Year of induction: 2018

Mitchell J. Nathan, Ph.D., studies how we think, teach, and learn, with particular emphasis on the role that language and embodied processes plays in understanding mathematics and engineering disciplines. His research explores the development of algebraic reasoning, expert blind spot in teaching, how cohesion processes support integrated STEM education, computer animation to support mathematics story problem solving, and the embodied nature of mathematical intuition and geometric proof, and its implications for video game design and knowledge assessment.

He has authored over 150 peer-reviewed publications, and has secured research funds from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U. S. Dept. of Education-Institute of Educational Sciences (IES), and the James S. McDonnell Foundation (JSMF). He is currently IES Principal Investigator on “How dynamic gestures and directed actions contribute to mathematical proof practices.” Dr. Nathan was a founding officer of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (2002), he founded the American Education Research Association (AERA) Division C section on Engineering and Computer Science Education (2013), co-Chaired CSCL10 (2013), and co-founded EMIC (2016), an international group of scholars and educators focused on embodied mathematical imagination and cognition. He was Visiting Professor (2011–2016) for the Latin American School for Education, Cognitive and Neural Sciences, and served on multiple committees for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to advance science and engineering education. He is an inductee of the University of Wisconsin’s Teaching Academy, which promotes excellence in teaching in higher education, and served on its executive board. Nathan has, since 2017, served as the inaugural Chair of the Teachers as Learners (TaL) grant program, funded by JSMF.

Miguel Nussbaum

Miguel Nussbaum

Full Professor for Computer Science, School of Engineering, Universidad Católica de Chile

[email protected]
https://www.ing.uc.cl/en/academicos-e-investigadores/miguel-nussbaum-voehl
Year of induction: 2021

Miguel Nussbaum is full professor for Computer Science at the School of Engineering of the Universidad Católica de Chile and is department head. In 2004 won the innovation in education prize of the Organization of American States (INELAM), in 2011 won the Innovation in Education Prize of Chile for his work in education, and in 2018 the Universidad Andres Bello (Chile) award in education. He was member of the board of the Chilean Agency for the Quality of Education and is Co-editor of Computers & Education. He has two MOOCs (in Spanish) in Coursera on The Constructivist Classroom, and on the 4Cs (Communication, Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Creativity). His pedagogical methodologies supported by collaborative technology for transforming the classroom experience have been used in schools in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Brazil, Guatemala, India, England, Sweden, USA Uruguay, and UK, were endorsed by UNESCO, and supported by the Chilean Government, Bradesco Foundation (Brazil), Microsoft, HP, INTEL, Plan Ceibal (Uruguay), and the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB). His current interest is in deploying the 21st century skills, specifically the 4Cs plus Conation/Gritt, both at school and university level.
Jun Oshima Headshot

Jun Oshima

Professor at the Graduate School of Integrated Science and Technology at Shizuoka University, Japan

Year of induction: 2023

Jun Oshima is a Professor at the Graduate School of Integrated Science and Technology at Shizuoka University, Japan. He has researched knowledge-building practices in Japanese school curricula from elementary school level to higher education. His recent contribution is a proposal of a new assessment approach to identifying how learners are engaged in constructing their collective intelligence by using social network analysis of discourse. With the development of the analysis software, he has conducted several studies to establish indicators of knowledge-building practices. In addition, his academic interest has been expanded toward multimodal learning analytics through his collaboration with the sensor technology engineering team and natural language processing research team to envision how verbal and nonverbal interactions lead to productive learning outcomes. In service to ISLS, he has tried to bridge the gap between ISLS and a community of Japanese scholars by establishing an affiliate and working as a director. He is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning and the Journal of the Learning Sciences and a co-editor of the International Handbook of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning.

Roy Pea

Roy Pea

David Jacks Professor of Education and Learning Sciences, and Professor, Computer Science (Courtesy), Stanford University

 [email protected]
https://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/roypea
Year of induction: 2017

Roy Pea is David Jacks Professor of Education & Learning Sciences at Stanford University, School of Education, and Computer Science (Courtesy), Director of the H-STAR Institute (Human Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research), and founder and Director of Stanford’s Ph.D. program in Learning Sciences and Technology Design. Published extensively—225 publications including 5 edited volumes in K–12 learning and education, especially science, math & technology fostered by advanced technologies including scientific visualization, on-line learning communities, digital video collaboratories and mobile computers. Co-Editor of Learning Analytics in Education (2018); Co-author of the 2010 US National Education Technology Plan; Co-editor of Video Research in the Learning Sciences (2007); NAS co-author of How People Learn (2000). Fellow of the National Academy of Education, Association for Psychological Science, American Educational Research Association, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. President of the International Society for the Learning Sciences (2004–2005); ISLS Inaugural Fellow (2017). Roy holds five patents in interactive and panoramic video innovations and received innovation awards from Apple Computer, IBM. Co-Founder & Director of Teachscape.com (1999–2009), teacher professional development services company. Launched & directed 1st Learning Sciences Ph.D. Program, Northwestern, 1991. In 1978, received doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Oxford, England, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. His consulting has included education program advisement for Ameritech, Apple Computer, Atlantic Philanthropies, ETS, Fisher Price, George Lucas Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Markle Foundation, Mellon Foundation, National Science Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation, Scholastic, Sesame Workshop, Sloan Foundation, Spencer Foundation, the states of Illinois and California, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, Finland, Singapore, Sweden, and Taiwan.

Jim Pellegrino

Jim Pellegrino

University of Illinois at Chicago, Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor; Distinguished professor of Education; Co-Director of Learning Sciences Research Institute

 [email protected]
https://lsri.uic.edu/profiles/pellegrino-james
Year of induction: 2019

James W. Pellegrino is Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor and Co-director of the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research and development interests focus on children’s and adult’s thinking and learning and the implications of cognitive research and theory for assessment and instructional practice. He has published over 300 books, chapters and articles in the areas of cognition, instruction and assessment. His research is funded by the National Science Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences, and private foundations. He has served on several National Academy of Sciences study committees, including chair of the Study Committee for the Evaluation of the National and State Assessments of Educational Progress, co-chair of the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice, and co-chair of the Committee on the Foundations of Assessment which issued the report Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. Most recently he served as a member of the Committee on Science Learning: Games, Simulations and Education, as a member of the Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New Science Education Standards, as chair of the Committee on Defining Deeper Learning and 21st Century Skills, and co-chair of the Committee on Developing Assessments of Science Proficiency in K–12. He is a past member of the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council, a lifetime Associate of the National Academy of Sciences, a lifetime member of the National Academy of Education and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

William Penuel

William Penuel

Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development, School of Education, University of Colorado Boulder

 [email protected]
 https://www.colorado.edu/education/william-penuel
Year of induction: 2019

Bill Penuel is a Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development in the School of Education and Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. He designs and studies curriculum materials, assessments, and professional learning experiences for teachers in science. He works in partnership with school districts and state departments of education, and the research he conducts is in support of educational equity in three dimensions: (1) equitable implementation of new science standards; (2) creating inclusive classroom cultures that attend to students’ affective experiences and where all students have authority for constructing knowledge together; and (3) connecting teaching to the interests, experiences, and identities of learners. His research employs a wide range of research methods, including one his colleagues and he have developed called design-based implementation research (http://learndbir.org). He regularly offers workshops to researchers and education leaders on how to build and sustain research-practice partnerships and has authored two books on research-practice partnerships, Creating Research-Practice Partnerships in Education (Harvard Education Press, 2017), and Connecting Research and Practice for Educational Improvement (Routledge, 2018). He is a member of the National Academy of Education, and he is a Fellow of both the International Society for Design and Development in Education and the American Educational Research Association. He received his B.A. from Clark University in psychology in 1991, his Ed.M. in Counseling Processes from Harvard University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Clark University in 1996.

Thomas Philip

Thomas Philip

Professor at the UC Berkeley School of Education

Year of induction: 2024

Thomas M. Philip is a professor at the UC Berkeley School of Education where he also serves as the Faculty Director of the Berkeley Teacher Education Program. His research introduced a systematic study of ideology, particularly racial ideologies, into the field of the learning sciences. He studies how ideology shapes learning and how learning is a site of ideological contestation and becoming. As a learning scientist and teacher educator, he is interested in how teachers make sense of power and hierarchy, and act on their sense of agency as they navigate and ultimately transform classrooms and institutions toward more equitable, just, and democratic practices and outcomes. His scholarship also explores the possibilities and tensions that emerge with the use of artificial intelligence and digital learning technologies in classrooms. Philip is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and his research has been recognized by the AERA Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education) Midcareer Award; the AERA Division G (Social Context of Education) Early Career Award; the AERA Division C (Learning & Instruction) Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies; the National Association for Multicultural Education’s Research Award; and, the National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. Philip directs the Berkeley Teacher Education Program, which under his leadership, was awarded the 2023 AERA Division K Award for Innovations in Research on Equity and Social Justice in Teaching and Teacher Education and the 2024 UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Award for Advancing Excellence and Equity.
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Nichole Pinkard

Alice Hamilton Professor of Learning Sciences in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University and the Office of Community Education Partnerships faculty director

Year of induction: 2024

Dr. Nichole Pinkard is a distinguished learning scientist and educational technology innovator celebrated for her transformative contributions to digital literacy and youth engagement. She is the Alice Hamilton Professor of Learning Sciences in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University and the Office of Community Education Partnerships faculty director. Dr. Pinkard focuses on creating digital learning environments that ensure equitable access to educational resources for underserved youth.With a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Northwestern University, Dr. Pinkard integrates technical expertise with educational theory, advancing the field of learning sciences. She founded the Digital Youth Network (DYN), which empowers young people with digital media skills through integrated learning opportunities, closes the digital divide, and fosters digital proficiency. As the lead architect of YOUmedia at the Harold Washington Library in Chicago, Dr. Pinkard has redefined library spaces for youth engagement. YOUmedia provides a dynamic environment for teens to explore digital media, collaborate on projects, and develop critical 21st-century skills. This model has been replicated nationwide, setting a new standard for library-based youth development. Her recent work on “Opportunity Landscaping” maps and optimizes community resources to enhance learning opportunities and aims to make visible the ecosystem of opportunities available in a community to facilitate collaborative approaches to addressing inequities by improving geographic access to educational resources. Dr. Pinkard’s contributions have earned her numerous accolades, including an NSF Early CAREER Award, Common Sense Media Award, the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies, and recognition as an AERA Fellow cementing her reputation as a thought leader in using technology to create inclusive and engaging educational environments.
Joseph Polman

Joe Polman

Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development, Associate Dean for Research, School of Education, University of Colorado Boulder

[email protected]
https://www.colorado.edu/education/joseph-polman
Year of induction: 2021

Joe Polman is a Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development, as well as Associate Dean for Research, in the School of Education at University of Colorado Boulder. Formerly, he was a Professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. His Bachelor of Arts is in Comparative Literature (with German) from Brown University. After a brief stint in the software industry, he pursued and completed his doctorate in Learning Sciences at Northwestern University. He is a past president of the International Society of the Learning Sciences and has served on the editorial boards of Journal of the Learning Sciences, Cognition & Instruction, American Educational Research Journal, and Journal of Research in Science Teaching. He has been a program co-chair of two International Conferences of the Learning Sciences (2014 and 2016). He has authored and co-authored numerous scholarly works, including the books Designing Project-based Science: Connecting Learners through Guided Inquiry (2000) and Compose Our World: Project-based Learning in Secondary English Language Arts (2021). Dr. Polman designs and studies project-based learning environments for youth and adults in schools and community-based programs. He focuses on learning and identity development connected to practices of communities of people pursuing science, literacy, history, and journalism. He seeks to identify and make accessible practices from the disciplines and professions that learners can find meaningful and transformative in their lives. An important goal of his research is informing the design of learning environments that involve people with powerful tools for democratic participation, in pursuing personal and civic action.
Brian Reiser

Brian Reiser

Professor of Learning Sciences, Northwestern University

[email protected]
https://sites.northwestern.edu/brianreiser
Year of induction: 2021

Brian Reiser is professor of learning sciences at Northwestern University. Reiser’s work explores how to make science learning more meaningful in K-12 classrooms as students build scientific knowledge in the context of addressing questions and problems they identify. Reiser’s research examines how to support students in science knowledge-building practices through curriculum materials and teaching approaches, and how teachers learn as they make sense of and enact these reforms. Reiser heads the NextGen Science Storylines project, a researcher-teacher collaborative developing and investigating storyline units, in which students help manage the trajectory of their science knowledge building. Reiser leads the Northwestern team of the OpenSciEd Developer’s Consortium, working with 10 state education agencies to create and field test middle school and high school research-based storyline instructional materials released as open educational resources. Reiser was a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Science Education from 2011 to 2018. He served on the NRC committee authoring A Framework for K-12 Science Education (guiding development of the Next Generation Science Standards [NGSS]), and subsequent reports recommending policies for NGSS assessment and implementation. Reiser collaborated with districts and states around the country to design and support professional learning programs supporting K12 teachers in NGSS implementation. Reiser was a founding member at Northwestern of the first graduate program in learning sciences, and chaired the program from 1993, shortly after its inception, until 2001. Reiser earned his Ph.D. from Yale University, and has been a researcher and professor at Carnegie Mellon University and Princeton University.
Jeremy Roschelle

Jeremy Roschelle

Executive Director, Learning Sciences Research, Digital Promise

 [email protected]
 https://digitalpromise.org/our-team/jeremy-roschelle
Year of induction: 2019

Jeremy Roschelle is the Executive Director of Learning Sciences Research at Digital Promise, a nonprofit research organization that works closely with innovative schools. He is know for research on computer-supported collaborative learning; learning with connected, mobile devices; technology in mathematics learning; and for working on the challenge of scaling up learning sciences innovations. He has conducted rigorous efficacy research on personalized, adaptive learning, on online homework tools, and on dynamic visualizations for mathematics learning. His 25 years of research experience have led to over 125 publications and 9 patents, resulting in over 15,000 citations. Since 2012, he has been the leader of large knowledge network of US projects in the area of “cyberlearning” which combines learning sciences, computer science and data science to investigate the future of learning. He has collaborated extensively with colleagues in the US, Singapore, Taiwan, the UK and Israel and has hosted many international learning scientists in California during their sabbatical year. Currently, he is working on bringing learning sciences into large scale school improvement in partnerships with Digital Promise’s League of Innovative Schools—a network of school districts that educate 4 million students. Dr. Roschelle has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Learning Sciences for over 20 years and is currently working with the ISLS publications committee to develop a Rapid Community Reports series. He is excited to work with new generations of learning scientists to make our field even stronger and more impactful.

Carolyn Penstein Rosé

Carolyn Rosé

Professor of Language Technologies and Human-Computer Interaction, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

 [email protected]
 https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~cprose, & http://dance.cs.cmu.edu
Year of induction: 2017

Dr. Carolyn Penstein Rosé’s research program is focused on better understanding the social and pragmatic nature of conversation, and using this understanding to build computational systems that can improve the efficacy of conversation between people, and between people and computers. She invokes theories and methods from computational discourse analysis, conversational agents, and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning. Her approach is to investigate how conversation works from a theoretical perspective and then formalize this understanding in models that are precise enough to be reproducible and demonstrate explanatory power in connection with outcomes with real world value. Her research has birthed and contributed to the growth of two areas of research: namely, Automated Analysis of Collaborative Learning Processes and Dynamic Support for Collaborative Learning, where intelligent conversational agents support collaborative learning in a context sensitive way. Her research group’s highly interdisciplinary work, published in over 200 peer reviewed publications, is represented in the top venues in 5 fields: namely, Language Technologies, Learning Sciences, Cognitive Science, Educational Technology, and Human-Computer Interaction, with awards in 3 of these fields. She serves as Past President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences, Senior member of IEEE, Executive Editor of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, and Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies. In her professional service, she has taken the opportunity to build bridges between research communities that foster multi-disciplinary collaborations. In that capacity, she has served as Founding Chair of the International Alliance to Advance Learning in the Digital Era.

Nikol Rummel

Nikol Rummel

Professor of Educational Psychology, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany
Adjunct Professor at the Human Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA

 [email protected]
 https://ife.rub.de/pp/team/nikol-rummel
Year of induction: 2019

Nikol Rummel is a Full Professor of Educational Psychology in the Institute of Educational Research at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA. Nikol completed both her Diploma in Psychology, her Ph.D., as well as her “Habilitation” (postdoctoral thesis) at the University of Freiburg, Germany. She also holds a Master’s degree in Educational Psychology from the University of Wisconsin -Madison. One of her main research interests is on developing and evaluating instructional support for collaborative learning, with a focus on computer-supported settings (CSCL) and on adaptive collaborative learning support. Another focus of her work is on developing methods for automated analyses of process data combining multiple data sources. Furthermore, she works on the assistance dilemma, that is, on the question of when to withhold and when to provide instruction in order to optimally support learning. She was an elected member of the Board of Directors (2013–2019) and past president (2016–2017) of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS). She is Associate Editor of Instructional Science, and Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, of the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, and of Learning & Instruction. Nikol has published over 40 journal articles in leading international research journals, as well as over 100 refereed book chapters and conference papers.

William Sandoval

William Sandoval

Professor, Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

 [email protected]
https://gseis.ucla.edu/directory/william-sandoval
Year of induction: 2019

William A. Sandoval studied Computer Science at the University of New Mexico, and earned his Ph.D. in the Learning Sciences from Northwestern University in 1998. His research focuses on epistemic cognition—how people think about what and how they know. He is especially interested in how science learning in school can promote a deep understanding of scientific argument that supports productive engagement with science in public life. He edited (with Jeffrey Greene and Ivar Bråten) the first International Handbook of Epistemic Cognition. He has published and presented internationally in science education, educational psychology, and the learning sciences. He served as associate editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences for several years, and continues to serve on the editorial boards of JLSCognition & InstructionEducational Psychologist, and Science Education. He served on the National Research Council study panel that produced America’s Lab Report in 2005, and regularly advises various science education groups. Prof. Sandoval is as an expert on educational design research, most widely recognized for developing the now popular technique of conjecture mapping. He chaired the ISLS Conference Committee from 2009–2016, was elected to the ISLS Board of Directors in 2011, and served as the Society’s president in 2017–2018. He is also a member of the American Educational Research Association, the National Association of Research on Science Teaching, the American Psychological Association, and is a Fellow of the International Society of Design and Development in Education.

David Williamson Shaffer

David Williamson Shaffer

Sears Bascom Professor of Learning Analytics and the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Data Philosopher at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research

Year of induction: 2024

David Williamson Shaffer is the Sears Bascom Professor of Learning Analytics and the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Data Philosopher at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research. Before coming to the University of Wisconsin, Professor Shaffer taught grades 4-12 in the United States and abroad, including two years working with the US Peace Corps in Nepal. His M.S. and Ph.D. are from the Media Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Shaffer taught in the Technology and Education Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and was a 2008-2009 European Union Marie Curie Fellow. His current focus is on merging statistical and qualitative methods to construct fair models of complex and collaborative human activity. Professor Shaffer has led the development of a suite of quantitative ethnographic tools that are being used by more than a thousand researchers in 20 countries as part of the annual International Conference on Quantitative Ethnography. He has authored more than 250 publications with over 100 co-authors, including How Computer Games Help Children Learn and Quantitative Ethnography.
NancySonger1

Nancy Songer

Dean and Professor in the College of Education at the University of Utah

Year of induction: 2022

Dr. Nancy Butler Songer is Dean and Professor in the College of Education at the University of Utah. Songer’s research focuses on creating instructional and assessment systems that emphasize pre-college students’ science investigations and engineered solutions to address local Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) challenges. The work includes the original design of curricular units, customized technologies, assessment tools, and teacher resources in interdisciplinary STEM topics, such as climate change and urban biodiversity. Current research work funded by the National Science Foundation articulates an instructional approach called Eco-solutioning, an approach designed to deepen secondary students’ understanding of three-dimensional science by creating and sharing solutions with community stakeholders. Songer was the first Science Educator to receive a Presidential Faculty Fellowship from the President of the United States. Songer was also Co-Chair of the National Academy of Sciences Committee: Science and Engineering for Grades 6-12 and a recipient of two Fulbright awards. Other awards include a NARST Early Career Research Award, US Department of Education Promising Educational Technology Award, and Computerworld Smithsonian award for early work exploring the Internet’s educational value.

Gerry Stahl

Gerry Stahl

Professor Emeritus in Computing and Informatics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

 [email protected]
 http://gerrystahl.net
Year of induction: 2017

Gerry Stahl explores the potential of extending cognition from individuals to knowledge building by small groups. Can groups conduct various forms of cognition—such as thinking about mathematical problems—as groups? How can groups learn to think collaboratively? How can networked computational devices support this? What are the theoretical, pedagogical, technological and research aspects of this effort? His research has put students in groups and recorded their interactions in detail to explore such issues. He has documented that groups can think, but only when carefully nurtured.

Gerry Stahl studied philosophy and computer science at MIT, Northwestern, Heidelberg, Frankfurt and Colorado. Introduced to CSCL by Gerhard Fischer and Timothy Koschmann at Boulder. Active in every CSCL conference from 1995 through 2015; Program Chair of CSCL 2002. Attended every ICLS conference from 1998 to 2014. Founding Board member of ISLS. Directed the Virtual Math Teams (VMT) research project at the Math Forum 2002–2014. Co-authored “CSCL: An Historical Perspective” with Tim Koschmann and Dan Suthers. Published five books on CSCL: “Group Cognition: Computer Support for Building Collaborative Knowledge”, “Studying Virtual Math Teams”, “Translating Euclid: Designing a Human-centered Mathematics”, “Constructing Dynamic Triangles Together: The Development of Mathematical Group Cognition”, “Theoretical Investigations: Philosophical Foundations of Group Cognition.” Self-published e-library of 16 volumes of essays on social philosophy, educational software design, interaction analysis, sculpture, etc. (available at http://gerrystahl.net/elibrary ). Founded and edited the International Journal of CSCL from 2006 through 2015. Taught CSCL and software design at Colorado and Drexel Universities. Retired 2014.

Edna Tan Headshot

Edna Tan

Hooks Distinguished Professor of STEM education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Year of induction: 2023

Edna Tan, PhD, is Hooks Distinguished Professor of STEM education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She was formerly a chemistry and biology secondary school teacher in the Republic of Singapore. Her research investigates the design, support and outcomes of equitable and consequential STEM learning for historically underrepresented youth across learning contexts and over time. She has engaged in extensive research and development work with Title-1 schools and communities facing formidable, systemic inequities, co-designing and co-enacting reform-based, justice-oriented professional development for teachers and curricula in classrooms. With community stakeholders in longitudinal research-practice-partnerships, Edna’s work is focused on minoritized youths’ authoring of rightful presence and the allied sociopolitical struggles that such are contingent upon, as an integral part of learning in science and engineering, across formal and informal settings. Current projects include community-engaged research with minoritized and refugee youth engaging in makerspace work, focused on identifying the elements of an authentic, community-owned and youth-centered making space; and working with middle school teachers in co-developing and enacting science and engineering curriculum that attends to students’ rightful presence toward justice-oriented ends. Her research has been published in the American Educational Research Journal, Educational Researcher, Teachers College Record, the Journal of the Learning Sciences, Journal of Research in Science Education and Science Education, among others. In 2020, Edna was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Jan van Aalst

Jan van Aalst

Associate Professor (Retired) at the University of Hong Kong

Year of induction: 2020

Jan van Aalst’s research has focused on knowledge building, an approach that emphasises students’ agency and metacognition, collaborative learning, and inquiry- based learning within a community. His team has studied pedagogical designs for knowledge building in schools in Hong Kong and China and has developed web- based tools and practices to support students’ self-directed assessment of their knowledge building; his work has involved students across a wide range of achievement levels. In 2013 he created a Masters sub-progrmme focusing on putting the key findings from the learning sciences into practice, which was popular with teachers from China, Hong Kong and farther abroad. Although now retired, he was at the University of Hong Kong since 2007, where he also was associate dean for research, and continues to teach part-time. He was Co-editor in Chief of Journal of the Learning Sciences and served on the ISLS Board of Directors. From 2019 to 2023, he was a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Teacher Education in The University of Twente. He currently works as a volunteer at an inner-city primary school in the Netherlands to support their educational activities, and is writing a book om learning for the general public. His doctoral advisees in the learning sciences inlcuded Ma Guanzhong, Feng Xueqi, Yang Yuqin, and Ella Fu. He lives in Rotterdam and Hong Kong.
Susan Yoon

Susan Yoon

Professor of Education, Learning Sciences and Science Education, University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education

 [email protected]
 https://www.gse.upenn.edu/academics/faculty-directory/yoon
Year of induction: 2019

Susan Yoon, Ph.D., is Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 2005. She has research interests in science and technology education, complex systems, social network and social capital applications for learning. Her work spans both formal and informal science and technology environments where she has developed tools, curricula, and PD activities to support sense making through visualization tools, socioscientific sensibilities, and decision-making about science in real world contexts. She has researched the affordances of wearable and mobile technologies, MOOC platforms for collaborative PD, augmented reality technologies, digital knowledge-building platforms, and agent-based computer simulations that support STEM content learning and participation. Her most recent project in conjunction with the Perelman School of Medicine at Penn investigates how to incorporate research in the field of biomedical informatics into high school environmental science curriculum to engage students in local scientific action. She is the recipient of the 2009 AERA Division C Jan Hawkins Award for early career contributions. She has served on several ISLS committees including as Membership Committee Chair (2013­–2017); Education Committee member (2009–2017); Publications Committee member (2017–present); NAPLeS advisory board (2010–2018); and CSCL 2017 Conference Co-Chair. She has also co-chaired several ISLS Early Career Workshops and Doctoral Consortia (2017, 2012, 2010)  She sat on the ISLS Board of Directors for the 2013–2019 term and is co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Learning Sciences for the period 2017–2020.

Jianwei Zhang Headshot

Jianwei Zhang

Associate Professor, School of Education, University at Albany, State University at New York

Year of induction: 2023

Jianwei Zhang is Associate Professor, School of Education, University at Albany, State University at New York. He studies how students work as knowledge builders to address authentic challenges facing the local and global communities, leveraging creative knowledge processes and technologies.  Funded by the National Science Foundation and other sources, he carries out design-based research on how to engage students’ epistemic agency for co-organizing collective inquiry directions and opportunistic groups, which enhance creative work with ideas over an extended time span. His research further extends to cross-community collaboration, which gives student ideas a larger stage with a longer social life. The research findings and technology designs (e.g., Idea Thread Mapper, KNILT) inform new opportunities to create flexible classroom configurations and digital spaces for sustaining students’ knowledge building across traditional boundaries. His research features extensive collaboration with teacher innovators in China, Canada, and the U.S. and received the UAlbany Distinguished Public Engagement award. Zhang is co-Editor in Chief of the Journal of the Learning Sciences for the period of 2021-2024. He has served as a member of the Membership Committee and CSCL Committee of ISLS and co-chaired/mentored several ISLS Early Career Workshops and Doctoral Consortia. He received his B.A. (education) and Ph.D. (educational psychology) from Beijing Normal University.