ISLS General Announcements

Keep up to date with all the latest ISLS news!
Nov
01

Special Issue Call for Proposals

Journal of the Learning Sciences is inviting proposals for a special issue, to be published in 2022. Instructions for preparing a proposal are posted on the Instructions to Authors at the publisher’s website, https://tinyurl.com/y9neyuhd. Proposals are due December 2, 2019 and will be peer reviewed by the journal’s editorial leadership team. Submitters of the accepted proposal will be notified in February 2020.

In general, we are interested in proposals on emerging themes in the field. For example, proposals that take up the call for research that has impact on teaching and policymaking that was elaborated in a guest editorial in issue 27 (1); on the intersection of the learning sciences and the future of work; on novel methodological and technological approaches to teaching and learning; on artificial intelligence and learning, and so on. This list is not meant to limit the range of possibilities, but to provide some examples of possible themes. We are interested in receiving proposals that reflect the global membership of the ISLS community. This may include multiple suggested authors, a guest editor, or a discussant from outside of the United States.

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Oct
25

JLS Upcoming Webinar on Classroom Dialogue with the Cambridge Educational Dialogue Team


What is really known about classroom dialogue? Which aspects are relevant for student learning – and which do not matter?

Join the online conversation with the Cambridge Educational Dialogue Team Christine Howe, Sara Hennessy, Neil Mercer, and panelists - Christa Asterhan, and Antonia Larrain on Nov 13. #JLSWebinar #dialogicteaching #educationaldialogue

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Jun
27

Issue 28 (3) is available online!

Issue 28 (3) is available online!

IN THIS ISSUE: In Rosemary Russ and Leema Berland use activity theory to demonstrate how the pervasive tension between learning correct ideas and constructing one’s own ideas often results in unacknowledged slippage between competing activity systems within reform efforts. Marc Clarà investigates how discursively symmetric dialogue develops across lessons in collective inquiry. Doris Chin et al. test choice-based assessments (CBAs), which measure how people learn when there is minimal guidance and they must make decisions as independent learners, in the context of teaching design-thinking strategies to 6th-graders. Christina Barbieri et al. examine the effectiveness of self-explanation prompts, visual signalling cues, and a combination of the two features on middle school students’ algebra learning.

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Jun
27

The Best Paper Published in JLS Award for 2018


The Best Paper Published in JLS Award for 2018 was announced on June 21, at the closing session of the CSCL conference in Lyon. The award was won by Sarit Barzilai and Clark A. Chinn for their paper, "On the goals of epistemic education: Promoting apt epistemic performance,” published in 27(3), 353-389. The paper will be available open access till the end of September. Congratulations to Sarit and Clark!
 
 
 
Jun
21

2018 impact factor 3.545

The JLS impact factor for 2018 is 3.545, which is up from 3.000 in the previous year. The current rank is 8/243 for Education and Education Research, and 7/59 in Educational Psychology. Congratulations to all the authors, editors and reviewers whose work made this good result possible.

May
25

Issue 28 (2) online

In this issue: David Klahr comments on what he argues is a misrepresentation of Pasteur’s Quadrant in the learning sciences. Christina Krist et al. synthesize and build on existing frameworks to identify essential characteristics of students’ mechanistic reasoning across scientific content areas. They argue that these characteristics can be represented as epistemic heuristics, that implicitly guide mechanistic reasoning. Janneke van de Pol et al. investigate how adaptive support promotes students’ learning. They investigate (35 lessons, 7 teachers) to what extent the effect of contingent support for students’ learning is mediated by the extent to which students take up teachers’ support in subsequent small-group work. Danielle Keifert and Reed Stevens show how Inquiry as a members’ phenomenon reveals young children’s competence, sense-making, and joy in inquiry.
Mar
01

Joe Curnow and Susan Jurow to edit next special issue

In November we invited proposals for a special issue, to be published in early 2021. After reviews by the editors and associate editors of 7 proposals, we have selected: "Learning In and For Collective Social Action", to be edited by Joe Curnow (University of Manitoba) and Susan Jurow (University of Colorado). This proposal responds to a growing interest to politics, ethics and social justice in the field. We are excited about this proposal and look forward to working with the guest editors on it. Expect to see an open call for abstracts from the guest editors soon.

Mar
01

Angela Calabrese Barton and Anna Sfard receive JLS Reviewer of the Year recognition

Reviewing is a crucial service to the field, and each year JLS formally recognises its best reviewers. Selection criteria are: completing (1) multiple reviews that are thorough (2) and timely (3); that provide mentorship to authors; and (5) reflect the core values and practices of the field.

We are excited to announce that for 2018 the editorial team has selected Angela Calabrese Barton and Anna Sfard for the recognition.

Feb
14

JLS going to 5 issues per year

Issue 28 (1) is available online. This year we are going to 5 issues per year, so we should be able to get articles out a little quicker.

In this issue: constructing thematic interpretations (language arts); designing educational video games as objects to think with; learning science concepts from peer teaching (initial teacher education); and finding the best types of guidance for constructing self-explanations of sub-goals in programming.

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Oct
09

Changes to editorial board

We recently added several scholars to the editorial board: Ravit Duncan (Rutgers), Eleni Kyza (Cyprus), Crina Damsa (Oslo), Sanne Akkerman (Utrecht), and Carla Van Boxtel (Amsterdam). Bill Penuel (Colorado) will begin in February. We're excited to have all these scholars join the board!

Sep
29

Call for Special Issue Proposals

Journal of the Learning Sciences is inviting proposals for a special issue, to be published in 2021. Instructions for preparing a proposal are posted on the Instructions to Authors at the publisher’s website, https://tinyurl.com/y9neyuhd. Proposals are due November 15, 2018 and will be peer reviewed by the journal’s editorial leadership team. Submitters of the accepted proposal will be notified by the end of January, 2019.

In general, we are interested in proposals on emerging themes in the field. For example, proposals that take up the call for research that has impact on teaching and policymaking that was elaborated in a guest editorial in issue 27 (1); proposals on teacher education and professional development; proposals that consider social justice, power and ethics in the learning sciences; and so on. This list is not meant to limit the range of possibilities but to provide some examples of possible themes.

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Sep
21

JLS Best Paper Awards for 2017 Announced

Chi

The Best Paper Published in JLS Awards for 2017 were announced on June 27, at the closing of ICLS. There were two $500-awards in this inaugural year. Congratulations to all the authors! Both papers are open-access till the end of August.

Chi, M. T. H., Kang, S. & and Yagmourian, D. (2017). “Why students learn more from dialogue than monologue videos: Analyses of peer interactions”. JLS, 26 (1), 10-50. https://doi.org/10.1080/10508406.2016.1204546

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Jun
12

Best Paper Published in JLS Award

In our editorial in 2017 we noted that JLS had completed 25 years of publication. In that period it has been a consistently high-performing journal, and one of the flagship journals for the field of the learning sciences.

We are excited to announce that, beginning with volume 26 (2017), we have a created a new feature:  the annual Best Paper Published in JLS Award. The award recognises exceptional scholarship and contributions made to the field of the learning sciences via JLS, and permits reflection on the state of scholarship in the field beyond what is possible during the peer review process. Candidates for the award are nominated by the editors and associate editors, and the winner is selected by an external panel of distinguished learning scientists.

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Apr
25

JLS webinars

Pruitt-Igoe demolition in 1972

Part of JLS's social media strategy, we have begun to organise webinars in which an author discusses a new paper with a panel and audience. We've had 2 so far, and they have both been very engaging conversations! It is a great way to have a conversation about your new paper with some of the people you think need to know about it. We record the video (and edit it for length if necessary) and make it available here, so this is a good resource that can be used with the article, for example if you use it in a course. Seeing seasoned scholars discuss a research article can be a great learning experience for graduate students.

In the most recent webinar, Kevin O'Neill discussed his thought provoking Reports and Reflections article with Rogers Hall,Brian K. Smith and Josh Radinsky. O'Neill looked at big "failures" in modern architecture and urban design to see what we can learn from them for design research. In doing so, he makes a distinction between "designing for the future", that is, designing interventions that address conditions that we can reasonably expect to last, and "deigning the future", where one tries to create a new educational reality. The webinar especially explored faulty predictions and the unintended consequences of designs. Want to know more about what the picture shown here has to do with design research? Watch the full webinar video here

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Apr
17

Check out Our New Issue!

Issue 27 (2) is out!

Just in time for your reading during AERA.

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Mar
13

Reviewer of the Year Awards for 2017

In the last issue of 2017 we announced the 2017 winners of Journal of the Learning Sciences Reviewer of the Year Awards: 

  • Dr. Ming Ming Chiu, The Education University of Hong Kong;
  • Dr. Betsy Davis, University of Michigan;
  • Dr. David Stroupe, Michigan State University.

For these awards, we will make a change form previous years. The awards will be presented at the opening session of  ICLS 2018 in London. A letter will also be sent to their Dean.

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