Conference Overview > Pre-Conference Workshops  

Preconference Workshops

A fee is charged only to cover the cost of food and beverages. Tuesday sessions run from 9:00 to 5:30 and include morning coffee, lunch, and afternoon coffee and snacks. Wednesday sessions run from 9:00 to 12:00 and include morning coffee and lunch.

Workshop A: Coordination and Control in Handheld Mobile Computers for Education: Identifying Cross-cutting Factors
Leaders: Deborah Tatar, Virginia Tech; Charles Patton, SRI International; Yvonne Rogers, Indiana University
Tuesday, Full Day ($35)

A substantial number of exciting projects are exploring the design of handheld mobile computing for learning. This workshop will bring together creators of classroom activities, analysts of coordination frameworks, and architects of computer support systems with an eye towards uncovering needs, requirements, and assumptions in different projects. Participants will engage in structured walk-throughs of different existing and imagined activities, and discuss their implicit and explicit social and technical assumptions.

For more infomration about this workshop please e-mail .

Workshop B: Interaction & Learning in Chat Environments: A Workshop with Data Sessions
Leaders: Gerry Stahl & Alan Zemel, Virtual Math Teams Project, The Math Forum @ Drexel University
Tuesday, Full Day ($35)

Research groups around the world are using approaches inspired by Conversation Analysis to explore the processes of sense-making peculiar to textual exchanges mediated by chat technology. Such chat analysis allows researchers to observe the opportunities for and barriers to collaborative learning created by chat environments with various functionality. This day-long workshop will consist primarily of group data sessions analyzing chat logs, but will also consider theoretical and methodological implications for the study of computer support in the learning sciences.

For more information about this workshop please e-mail .

Workshop C: Authoring, Assessment & Open Source: Implications for Research and Classroom Application
Leaders: Janice D. Gobert, Robert Tinker, & Paul Horwitz, The Concord Consortium; Jim Slotta, The University of Toronto
Tuesday, Full Day ($35)

This workshop will present several complementary educational technologies that support science learning through curriculum authoring and delivery, scaffolded student activities, and the logging and reporting of student interactions for purposes of research and assessment. Participants will have hands-on experience with authoring environments that allow the design of highly interactive curriculum, fine-grained data logs and reports, and scalable portal functionality. These technologies take advantage of open source models to support dynamic communities of exchange.

For more information about this workshop please e-mail .

Workshop D: Dynamic Support for CSCL: Conceptual Approaches and Technologies for Flexible Support of Collaborative Knowledge Construction
Leaders: Carolyn Rosé & Gahgene Gweon, Carnegie Mellon University; Frank Fischer, University of Tuebingen; Nikol Rummel, Universitaet Freiburg; G. Molinari, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland.
Tuesday, Full Day ($35)

Recent work has produced technology capable of real time automatic analysis of collaborative learning discussions, which opens up the possibility for adaptive collaboration support based on a detailed analysis of the collaboration process as it unfolds, without requiring a rigidly constrained interaction. Nevertheless, the value of this new technology has not yet been demonstrated in practice. This workshop will explore the potential of this new technology to CSCL environments.

For more information about this workshop please e-mail .

Workshop E: Games, Learning & Society: Researching Technologies "In the Wild"
Leaders: Constance Steinkuehler & Kurt Squire, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Tuesday, Full Day ($35)

The goal of this workshop is connect research emanating from the nascent field of “games, learning, and society” to the more established field of the learning sciences. Through it, scholars who are considering (or already engaged in) research on videogames and fandom culture will develop their understanding of (a) the contemporary landscape of videogames, both those designed for entertainment and those designed for learning, (b) emerging findings in the field, and (c) methods for research.

For more information about this workshop please e-mail .

Workshop F: Problems in Planning: Attacking the issues of planning design-based research
Leaders: Chandra Orrill, Learning & Performance Support Lab, University of Georgia; Diana Joseph, University of Chicago
Wednesday, Morning ($25)

In this hands-on workshop, we will tackle participants' real dilemmas with planning and implementing design-based research (DBR). Each participant should submit a short overview (2 pages maximum) describing their current or planned research project, the theoretical framework from which they are working, and their most pressing challenge by June 15 to Chandra Orrill ([email protected]). These statements will be used to determine working groups prior to the workshop. During the session, each working group will collaborate to brainstorm solutions to the problems faced by each participant. The primary focus of this work is to move our individual projects forward. The secondary aim is to move DBR forward as a method by providing a forum for collecting and describing some of the challenges we face in our work as well as capturing some of the potential solutions. The workshop will close with a discussion of the implications of our real-world DBR problems for the evolution of the method.

For more information about this workshop please e-mail .

Workshop G: Studying Engaged Learning in Online Communities
Leaders: K. Ann Renninger, Swarthmore College; Sharon Derry, University of Wisconsin; Mary Marlino, DLESE; Wesley Shumar and Gerry Stahl, Drexel University; Dan Suthers, University of Hawaii; Stephen Weimar, Math [email protected] Wednesday, Morning ($25)

In this interactive session, participants will think together about "live" issues in the study of online communities as environments in which engaged learning can take place. Specifically, (a) What can we learn from contrasting cases of engaged learning in online communities? (b) Given differing methods, questions, timescales, grain sizes, philosophical orientations, and site contexts, how might generalizability of findings be ensured? (c) What do researchers need in order to develop a coherent theory of learning? Participants should submit a two-page statement briefly describing their experience working with or studying online communities and the nature of their interest in the proposed questions to Ann Renninger ([email protected]) by June 15. These statements will be made available to all participants via a wiki prior to the session.

For more information about this workshop please e-mail .

Workshop H: Designing, Assessing, and Evaluating Innovative STEM Instruction using the Virtual Design Center
Leaders: Beaumie Kim, Center for Educational Technologies, Wheeling Jesuit University
Wednesday, Morning ($25)

This workshop will help STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) instructional innovators learn to use resources in the NASA-sponsored Virtual Design Center to design, improve, and evaluate their learning environments. Participants will learn to align curricular routines to exiting content standards, and then develop useful classroom assessment materials. Participants will learn to use design-based methods to iteratively enhance and align classroom discourse, student understanding, and performance on external achievement measures.

For more information about this workshop please e-mail .