Book Announcement

Mark Chen has released a new book, The Life and Death of an Expert Player Group in World of Warcraft.

 Leet-Noobs-Warcraft Literacies Epistemologies

Leet Noobs documents, for over 10 months, a group of players in the online game World of Warcraft engaged in a 40-person joint activity known as raiding. Initially, the group was informal, a family that wanted to hang out and have fun. Before joining, each player had been recognized as expert in the game; within the group they had to adapt their expertise for the new joint task and align themselves to new group goals. Through their shared activity, members successfully established communication and material practices that changed as they had to renegotiate roles and responsibilities with new situations and as the larger gaming community evolved. Players learned to reconfigure their play spaces, enrolling third-party game mods and other resources into their activity. Once-expert players became novices or noobs to relearn expert or leet gameplay. They became leet noobs who needed to reconfigure their expertise for new norms of material practice. Ultimately, these norms also changed what it meant to play World of Warcraft; some group members no longer wanted to just hang out and have fun, and eventually the group died in an online fiery meltdown.

Related Articles

ISLS 2024 Reviewer Invitations

The ISLS 2024 team is thrilled to have received a large number of papers, posters, and symposia for this year’s annual meeting, a total of 893 submissions! We have currently sent out reviewer invitations to prior reviewers and 2024 submitters. If you fall under either of those categories and have NOT received an invitation and would like to volunteer, please check your email and spam folders.

JLS Outstanding Paper (2022): Utilizing dance resources for learning and engagement in STEM

This paper authored by Folashadé Solomon, Dionne Champion, Mariah Steele and Tracey Wright received the Outstanding Paper Award from the Journal of the Learning Sciences. As the selection panel comments, “By employing culturally responsive pedagogy, the authors established a connection between the learning of physics and dance education, thereby promoting access and equity…The meticulous analysis provided insights into how dance, as an embodied form of knowledge, facilitated a transformation in the black girls’ relationship with physics.”