Network of the Learning Sciences Canada Invited Learning Symposia

Choose Your Own Adventure: Tales from the academic job market

The academic job market can be confusing, opaque, and challenging – even with the wide variety of guidelines and advice available. In this panel, we move beyond checklists and sample documents to share our experiences of being on the academic job market, highlighting the messiness of the process, ethical and personal considerations, emotional aspects, and the decisions that led us to new faculty positions. Registration required see link below.

Panelists:

Dr. Rishi Krishnamoorthy, Penn State College of Education
Dr. Chris Ostrowdun, University of Leeds
Dr. Stephanie Hladik, University of Manitoba

Date & time: Thursday January 26, 2023

11:00-12:15 PST, 12:00-13:15 MST, 13:00- 14:15 CST, 14:00-15:15 EST,
15:00-16:15 AST

Attendees are encouraged to submit questions for the panelists ahead of time here: httRs://forms.gle/B3sVdm8VF6hJ9KHY.5

 

Register: https://bit.ly/3C1hiop

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