Foundations of the Learning Sciences

Summary

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Syllabi

Doctoral Seminar by Brent Davis & Michele Jacobsen, University of Calgary

Foundations of Learning Sciences by Devrim Güven, Günizi Kartal, Emine Erktin, Boğaziçi University

Foundations of the Learning Sciences by Lina Markauskaite, University of Sydney
Keywords: theories of technology-enhanced learning, cognitive learning theories, foundations of instructional design principles, foundations of learning sciences research

Historical and Philosophical Foundations in the Learning Sciences/Cognitive and Socio-cultural Foundations of the Learning Sciences by Pratim Sengupta, University of Calgary

Introduction or Learning Science I by Martina Rau, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Introduction or Learning Science II by Martina Rau, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Introduction to the Learning Sciences by Lina Markauskaite, University of Sydney
Keywords: theories of technology-enhanced learning, cognitive learning theories, foundations of instructional design principles, foundations of learning sciences research

Learning Sciences: Theories, Concepts, and Environments by Jimmy Scherrer, North Carolina State University

The Learning Sciences by Jan van Aalst, University of Hong Kong

Video Resources

Watch the full Introductory Session webinar on A Short History of the Learning Sciences featuring Chris Hoadley:

Watch the full Introductory Session webinar on Evolution of Research on CSCL featuring Pierre Dillenbourg:

Watch the full Introductory Session webinar on Introduction to CSCL Research featuring Dan Suthers:

Listen to the A Short History of the Learning Sciences webinar

Listen to the Evolution of Research on CSCL webinar

Listen to the Introduction to CSCL Research webinar

Reading

Basic Reading:
  • Dillenbourg, P. & Fischer, F. (2007). Basics of computer-supported collaborative learning. Zeitschrift für Berufs- und Wirtschaftspädagogik, 21, 111-130.
  • Hoadley, C. & Van Haneghan, J. (2011). The Learning Sciences: Where they came from and what it means for instructional designers. In R. A. Reiser & J. V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and Issues in Instructional Design and Technology (3rd ed., pp. 53-63). New York: Pearson.
  • Suthers, D. D. (2012). Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning. In N. M. Seel (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning. New York: Springer.
Additional Reading:
  • Hoadley, C. (2004). Learning and design: Why the learning sciences and instructional systems need each other. Educational Technology, 44(3), 6-1.
  • Hoadley, C. (2005). The shape of the elephant: Scope and membership of the CSCL community. In T. Koschmann, D. Suthers & T.-W. Chan (Eds.), Computer-supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) 2005 (pp. 205-210). Taipei, Taiwan: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  • Medina, R., & Suthers, D. D. (2013). Inscriptions becoming representations in representational practices. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 22(1), 33-69.
  • Stahl, G., Koschmann, T, & Suthers, D. (2006). CSCL: An historical perspective. Based on a chapter in: R. K. Sawyer (Ed.), Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences (pp. 409-426). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Suthers, D. D. (2006). Technology affordances for intersubjective meaning making: A research agenda for CSCL. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (ijCSCL), 1(3), 315-337.
  • Suthers, D. D. (2008). Empirical studies of the value of conceptually explicit notations in collaborative learning. In A. Okada, S. Buckingham Shum & T. Sherborne (Eds.), Knowledge Cartography (pp. 1-23). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.